Ancient Greece's Hospitality Customs

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2 years ago
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Hospitality: friendly and generous reception someone gives to friends and guests

2 years ago
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Xenia is the word the ancient Greeks used to describe their standards for hospitality. It literally means guest-friendship. Ancient Greeks knew these protocols in their house religiously, and taught it to their children. The act is usually from both sides meaning the guest gives respect for the host, to earn hospitality.

2 years ago
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A rule of thumb for their hospitality was this basic you give-you get concept. The host had to give food/drink and provide adequate bathroom access. The guest had to be respectful and above all not be a burden.

2 years ago
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They took these simple things so seriously, because they feared that they might induce the wrath of a god. They pictured that a god disguised as a nomad might come to their home seeking assistance, and if they were rudely turned away, they would be cursed.

2 years ago
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2 years ago
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This picture shows the woman aiding the guest and giving him a spot at the 'dinner table'.

2 years ago
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Hospitality is famously depicted in famous epics of The Odyssey and the Illiad. A common understanding of why hospitality was much more common back then it is now, is the effluxion of time and how we travel changed. Back them families might have traveled 10 miles back then on foot, and would be exhausted by the time they arrived. They deserved hospitality. 110 years ago 10 miles could be traveled on old bikes in 20 minutes. Nowadays, we can drive 10 miles in 10 minutes. Another reason of why people are less patient and want instant-gratification now more than ever.

2 years ago
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