1984 Reading Log
Alek Kozminski

Part 1 Sections 1-2

Summary: Winston Smith goes home after working and decides to start a diary. He flashes back to a "Hate Week" activity in which propoganda about the enemies of the main political party are forced upon the party's members. His female neighbor comes to ask him for help with her sink, so he fixes it. Winston then reflects upon the oppression that is heavily present in society.

Quote: "Always the eyes watching you and the voice enveloping you. Asleep or awake, working or eating, indoors or out of doors, in the bath or in bed—no escape. Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimetres inside your skull” (Orwell 36-37).

Questions: What similarities are there between modern society and the society in 1984?

Do you think our society might eventually evolve into a society similar to the society in 1984? Why or why not?

Learning Station 5

The novel 1984 by George Orwell is a prophetic warning of what the future might hold. While opposition to the ruling political party is not currently quelled the way opposition in 1984 is, some elements of the oppression in 1984’s society can already be seen in modern society. The inveterate idea of freedom of speech is being punished. Free speech is supposed to be unlimited, but there are many tacit limits to what can be said today without consequences. For instance, the government abjures people who expose its faults. Other people who oppose the main political party are subject to more tax audits. It will not be surprising if the opposition to the main political party are forced to hide their opinions, much like the clandestine Brotherhood in 1984.

The examples or propoganda that we found try to convince the viewer that one product is better than the other. One tries to convince the viewer that the Surface Pro 3 is better than macs, while the other asserts that Sprint is better than Verizon and AT&T. The examples are ads that can be found before youtube videos. The examples are effective in convincing the viewer that one company's product is a better use of the viewer's money than another popular company's product

Part 1 Sections 3-6

The novel 1984 by George Orwell is a prophetic warning of what the future might hold. While opposition to the ruling political party is not currently quelled the way opposition in 1984 is, some elements of the oppression in 1984’s society can already be seen in modern society. The inveterate idea of freedom of speech is being punished. Free speech is supposed to be unlimited, but there are many tacit limits to what can be said today without consequences. For instance, the government abjures people who expose its faults. Other people who oppose the main political party are subject to more tax audits. It will not be surprising if the opposition to the main political party are forced to hide their opinions, much like the clandestine Brotherhood in 1984.

Part 1 Sections 7-8

Questions:

1. Of the characters introduced so far, who do you think will be vaporized first and why?

2. Of the characters introduced so far, who is most likely to be an undercover agent of the Thought Police and why?

I think that man who sold Winston the diary is most likely part of the Thought Police. Buying things on the free market is illegal for Party members. It would be easier to see which Party members were taking part in this activity by setting up an undercover agent to sell things on the free market than it would be to put cameras on the thousands of streets of proles. In addition, "[The old man's] voice was soft, as though faded, and his accent less debased than that of the majority of proles" (Orwell 106). The way the old man talks is unusual enough to set him apart from the other proles, so he probably is not a prole.

3. Is the state of the world in 1984 better or worse than the state of the world today? Why?

Part 2 Sections 1-3

Winston and Julia are drawn to each other because of their similar political statuses and beliefs. Both of them believe that the Party's rules should be broken. Breaking the Party's rules makes Winston and Julia corrupt and criminals in the eyes of the Party, and because of this knowledge, Julia thinks “'Well then, I ought to suit you [(Winston)], dear. I’m corrupt to the bones'” (Orwell 138). Julia thinks that Winston should like her because she, like Winston, does not completely obey the Party. This disobedience is in fact why Winston decides that he loves her instead of wanting to kill her.

Big Brother Poster

A large portion of thought criminals are exposed to the government by their children. To break the family bonds between the parents and the children, Big Brother must use a strong motivating force. My poster shows some forms of motivation that Big Brother may have used.

Part 2 Sections 4-8

Section 4: “It was as though they were intentionally stepping nearer to their graves” (Orwell 153).

Section 5: “Syme had ceased to exist: he had never existed” (Orwell 161).

Section 6: “'I was talking recently to a friend of yours who is certainly an expert. His name has slipped my memory for the moment'” (Orwell 171).

Section 7: “'When once they get hold of us there will be nothing, literally nothing, that either of us can do for the other. If I confess, they’ll shoot you, and if I refuse to confess they’ll shoot you just the same'" (Orwell 180).

Section 8: "'You will work for a while, you will be caught, you will confess, and then you will die'" (Orwell 190).

Summary of Article

In the article Doublespeak and euphemisms in education," author Jerry L. Pully examines the increasing use of doublespeak and euphemisms in education and administration. Doublespeak is using deceptive language to get support. Pully lists several examples of doublespeak and euphemisms that he notices in modern times. Pully also mentions specific examples of doublespeak used by notable people. Pully concludes by asserting that people should not use doublespeak or euphemisms because doing so is typically evasive and/or deceitful.

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