Mark Cartwright and Dallas’ Carewright Clinical Services

Before settling in the greater Dallas, Texas, area, Mark Cartwright earned his bachelor of arts in psychology from Ohio University in Athens and his master and doctor of school psychology from Ohio State University in Columbus. He was a member of the National Honors Society at both institutions. Mark Cartwright subsequently completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Southwestern. During this time, he served as a clinical psychologist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and as a member of the autism assessment team at the Children’s Medical Center of Dallas.

Mr. Cartwright currently treats patients of all ages at Carewright Clinical Services. His therapeutic work at Carewright encompasses a variety of clinical conditions, including bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress syndrome, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, and schizophrenia. The organization also offers a range of psychoeducational assessments that test memory and other neuropsychological functions that might affect the academic performance of young people.

Types of Anxiety Disorders

As a licensed clinical psychologist, Mark Cartwright of Dallas, Texas, has treated a number of patients with anxiety. Mark Cartwright currently practices through Carewright Clinical Services of Dallas, where he uses solution-focused therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy to treat anxiety and other conditions.

Anxiety disorders can occur in a number of different forms. Generalized anxiety disorder, or GAD, causes a person to worry excessively even when there is no identifiable reason to do so. Panic disorder also causes anxious symptoms with no known cause, although episodes of this disorder come on suddenly and without warning. Symptoms include heart palpitations, chest pain, sweating, and a tightening of the throat, all of which may make a patient feel as if he or she is in the grips of a sudden and serious physical illness.

Other anxiety disorders arise in particular situations or in response to certain stimuli. Phobias, for example, cause intense fear, characterized by panicky feelings, shaking, and increased heart rate. The fear response of a phobia is typically out of proportion to the actual danger involved in relation to the fear, which can range from spiders to heights.

Similarly, social anxiety disorder causes individuals with the condition to worry that, when placed in a social situation, others are judging them or that they may cause others to judge them based on what they do or say. Like other anxiety disorders, social anxiety generates symptoms that interfere with normal body functionality and can stand in the way of building healthy relationships. Fortunately, therapeutic intervention can help individuals with anxiety to manage their symptoms and develop proactive coping strategies.