Maurice Prout

Leadership and Experience in Clinical Psychology

About Maurice Prout

Over the course of his career, Maurice Prout has upheld a commitment to advancing the field of psychology. He has served as vice chairperson of the Pennsylvania State Board of Psychology, sat on the board of Eagleville Hospital, and accepted a governor's appointment to the Vietnam Veterans Health Initiative Commission. Since 2000, Maurice Prout has been a founding fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.

In his current role as a professor at Widener University, a post he has held for more than 20 years, Maurice Prout teaches a variety of doctoral-level courses and leads the Respecialization Program at the Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology. His interests include mood and anxiety disorders, persistent pain management, and professional ethics. Outside the classroom, Maurice Prout sits on the University's Executive Committee, Institutional Review Board, and Academic Affairs Subcommittee.

Before joining Widener University, Maurice Prout served as supervisor of the Behavior Therapy Institute at Temple University Medical School, and taught at institutions like the University of Pennsylvania. He earned his doctor of philosophy from American University in Washington, DC, and his bachelor of science from St. Peter’s College in New Jersey.

NAN to Hold Annual Conference in Puerto Rico

An experienced psychologist and educator, Dr. Maurice Prout has taught graduate-level psychology students at Widener University in Chester, Pennsylvania, for more than 25 years. Throughout his career, Dr. Maurice Prout has maintained memberships in a number of organizations, including the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN), a nonprofit membership association that works to advance the field of neuropsychology through programs and activities aimed at research, advocacy, and education.

NAN is preparing to host its 34th Annual Conference at the El Conquistador Resort in Fajardo, Puerto Rico. More than 1,000 psychological professionals from across the United States are expected to attend the four-day event, which will be held November 12-15, 2014.

In addition to prominent presenters and lecturers, the conference will feature a diverse education program covering a variety of topics of import to clinicians, researchers, and practitioners working in the field of neuropsychology. The event will also include daily educational activities for neuropsychology students and trainees.

Outside of the educational programming, attendees will have the opportunity to discover the latest technologies, products, and services available to neuropsychologists at an exhibit hall that will be open November 13-15. Those in attendance at this year’s conference will also get the chance to explore all that Puerto Rico has to offer, such as great fishing, excellent golf courses, and beautiful natural scenery.

APA Reports Mental Health Care Disparities

A professor at Widener University’s Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology, Dr. Maurice Prout has published an extensive amount of research focused clinical interests like cognitive-behavioral therapy and treatment of mood disorders. An active member of the psychology community, Dr. Maurice Prout also maintains membership with a number of professional organizations, such as the American Psychological Association (APA).

The APA recently issued a press release publicizing a special issue of its journal, Psychological Services, which reported that primary care with culturally sensitive mental health evaluations and treatments can help overcome the inequities in mental health care among ethnic minorities. In the issue’s lead article by researchers at the Morehouse School of Medicine, the researchers state that minorities still encounter substantial disparities in mental health services, including inequalities in cost, quality, and stigma. These findings follow a U.S. surgeon general’s report from 13 years prior that declared that Latinos, African Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans generally receive inferior mental health care.

Along with the lead article, the special issue of the journal includes 12 articles on topics like care for ethnic minorities who are depressed, as well as a study of Latino primary care patients’ depression treatment.

Borderline Personality Disorder in Girl, Interrupted

As a professor at Widener University, Dr. Maurice Prout explores portrayals of psychiatric illnesses in films as a part of her teaching process. Dr. Maurice Prout draws on an in-depth knowledge of mood disorders and their treatments.

Although many films over the years have presented characters with suspected or diagnosed borderline personality disorder (BPD), the 1999 film Girl, Interrupted stands out as one of the most popular. In it, Winona Ryder plays a young woman committed to a psychiatric hospital with a BPD diagnosis. However, experts have reported that the characterization bears little resemblance to a real presentation of the condition, largely because the character does not show the emotional motivation behind her actions.

Patients with borderline personality disorder display rapid and intense mood swings. They can go from endearing and calm to enraged in what can seem to others like the blink of an eye. Psychiatrists and psychologists commonly attribute this behavior to a highly sensitive temperament, which the field now treats largely with self-management and behavioral therapy. Hospitalization such as that depicted in Girl, Interrupted is rarely helpful, as alone it does not teach patients the skills that they need to avoid destructive behaviors. When hospitalization is necessary for BPD patients, it is typically more effective when brief and followed by psychotherapy.

Paper Explores Treatment of Depression after Traumatic Brain Injury

Dr. Maurice Prout serves as a graduate-level psychology professor and program director with the Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology at Widener University. For more than 40 years, Dr. Maurice Prout has also conducted psychology research and co-authored numerous articles, including Depression after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Evidence for Clinical Heterogeneity.

According to the article, depression is a leading cause of disability for individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI), and estimates indicate that more than 50 percent of TBI patients have symptoms of depression. The authors assert that, in comparison to other conditions caused by TBI, depression is frequently misunderstood and poorly treated by rehabilitation and acute care professionals. In the paper, the authors explain that the mismanagement of depression for individuals with TBI is partly due to a shortage of well-defined etiological models on depression development after TBI.

The article contends that depression following TBI actually denotes a heterogeneous category comprised of various etiologic agents and clinical implications. Within the paper, the authors review different studies on the topic and particularly focus on the diversity of the clinical population. The article concludes with recommendations for diagnosis and treatment possibilities.

Grief after the Death of a Pet

Dr. Maurice Prout has extensive experience teaching about and studying the area of clinical psychology. Among the subjects Dr. Maurice Prout has researched is how people cope with the loss of a pet.

When people have pets, they welcome their animal companions into both their homes and their hearts. Pets are loved members of the family, and when they pass away, people often experience a difficult period of grieving. They might feel empty inside, experience a sense of disbelief that the loved pet is truly gone, as well as many other feelings associated with a deep loss.

This period of bereavement is challenging enough on its own, but it can be made even worse if others dismiss the person’s feelings because the missed loved one was an animal, not a person. If this occurs, the owner of the deceased pet might not feel as if he or she has the backing and support of others. Experts refer to grief that others in society do not recognize as legitimate as “disenfranchised grief.” The result may be that the person feels as if he or she should get over it and stop grieving.

However, a person going through this difficult period often needs help from others. Therefore, they might seek the help of a therapist or confidant who does not trivialize the event or the bond the person shared with the animal. With appropriate help and support, the pet owner will begin to feel better.

Society of Behavioral Medicine Hosted Annual Meeting in Washington, DC

Maurice Prout, PhD, is a psychologist who teaches doctoral-level graduate students at Widener University in Chester, Pennsylvania. Publisher of numerous articles and books on a variety of anxiety and mood disorders as well as behavioral medicine, Maurice Prout, PhD, has presented his findings to the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM).

A nonprofit organization founded in 1978, the SBM promotes the study of interactions between the environment and biology. It then applies these findings to improve the overall health and well-being of people, their families, and communities.

Each year the SBM hosts a meeting and scientific session in which members learn about changes made within the industry. The 2016 event, which occurred on March 30 through April 2 in Washington, DC, had a theme of Behavioral Medicine at a Crossroads: 21st Century Challenges and Solutions. This 37th annual event included continuing education opportunities, several keynote speakers and master lecturers, and abstract presentations. Opening keynote speaker Sean Duffy, who is CEO of Omada Health, discussed his firm’s online diabetes prevention program. Attendees also had a chance to meet with numerous exhibitors who highlighted their products and services.

American Psychological Association Honors Wisconsin Teacher with Award

A professor at Widener University in Chester, Pennsylvania, Maurice Prout, PhD, works as professor and director of its re-specialization program. Maurice Prout, PhD, has coauthored dozens of papers and books and has presented his work to several institutions, including the American Psychological Association (APA).

With a membership of more than 117,500 educators, researchers, clinicians, and consultants, the APA is the largest professional and scientific psychology organization in the country. It promotes the research of psychology, shares psychology knowledge through meetings and networking opportunities, and establishes a high standard of ethics and education for the industry.

In May 2016, the APA announced the winner of its award for excellence in education. Ami Ramponi, a psychology teacher at Kimberly High School in Wisconsin, won the 2016 APA TOPPS Charles T. Blair-Boeker Excellence in Teaching Award. TOPPS, which is the APA’s Committee of Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools, provides teaching materials and professional development to high school psychology students and teachers.

Ms. Ramponi gave several Sunday afternoons to help her students study for the 2015 AP psychology exam. She also organized a review day on Sundays in which nine teachers shared AP psychology concepts to local students.

Cognitive Behavior Therapy May Improve Outcomes for Tinnitus Patients

Dr. Maurice Prout guides advanced students at Widener University as they pursue doctoral degrees in psychology. Dr. Maurice Prout maintains a professional interest in empirically verified therapies in his field, including cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and its diverse applications.

In addition to its obvious benefits in strictly psychological applications, CBT has recently been shown to be an effective therapy for some tinnitus patients. Tinnitus is linked to hearing loss, but the irritating ringing is tied to brain functions as well. When the ear cannot detect a range of sounds, the brain supplies its own filler noise. Some doctors liken it to phantom limb pain, another example of the body reacting to a loss in function.

While it does not cure the condition, CBT can teach patients to focus their attention on something other than the ringing. This therapy gives patients the skills they need to deal with negative reactions to tinnitus and channel them into positive responses, allowing them to cope better in daily life.

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