21st Century Learning @
DRS


Rabbi Daniel Cooper

Rabbi Eliyahu Wolf

Rabbi Fleksher had the opportunity to sit down with Rabbi Doni Cooper and Rabbi Eliyahu Wolf and hear a little bit about their experiences at the Lookstein Center, where they have been taking a Flipped Classroom course. Throughout the year they had three full day conferences with various technologists and learning experts from around the world presenting on the many forms of flipped and advanced analytics available. They have received training from the creator of a popular app "Explain Everything", collaborate with peers of the team in monthly “clusters” and even learned from successful teachers who use “flipped" such as Ramsey Mussalem. Besides producing video and using various technologies (Camtasia, Zaption, Educreations), they feel that they have benefited most from sharing experiences on how using video has impacted the classroom.

AF: Thank you for joining me here today. Can you please share with me some of you have learned about Flipped learning any why it can be so beneficial in the classroom?

EW: We are always looking to improve our craft. Technology is a powerful and dynamic tool to harness; it potentially can expand the "walls" of the classroom. The idea of the flipped classroom is that it can free up more time for individualized instruction.

AF: Can you please share with us how flipped learning becomes useful in
your class?

DC: So far this year, we have experimented using various forms of “flipped learning”. One of the most common models of a flipped classroom is one that allows students to watch part of a lesson at home in order to use the classroom for more discussion, advanced analysis and group work.

At times, we have also used flipped lessons to buy student interest or “sell” a certain sugya or topic.

Even on lower level usage, flipped lessons have allowed weaker students to watch a lesson multiple times and no one has to know

AF: That sounds fantastic! What would you say are some of the challenges that arise from technology in the classroom?

EW: We do not need to fix that which is working well already. At the same time, we need to harness the available resources in a way that will be motivating, captivating and of course improve learning.

DC: To echo Rabbi Wolf, as Rebbeim, teachers of Torah, we do not need to fix that which is working well already. As Jews, we dance with the Torah on Simchas Torah, not with an iPad. We believe that we must continue to use sefarim, teaching our students how to use them as well as demonstrating to our students kedushas sefarim or sanctity of Jewish books. At the same time, we must leave no stone unturned, remain committed to harness available resources in a way that will be motivating, captivating and of course improve learning.

I would add that on a practical level, video production is very time consuming, certainly at the beginning of a training process.

AF: Thank you very much for your time!