Concentration Camp Life
and
Atrocities
The Final Solution

Concentration camp life was extremely inhumane. The definition of a concentration camp is a camp in which people are detained or confined, usually under harsh conditions and without regard to legal norms of arrest and imprisonment that are acceptable in a constitutional democracy. Concentration camps were most prominent during 1933-1945 in Nazi Germany. Camp life consisted of an awakening at 4am every morning. Then you were summoned to get your food for the day which was usually 10 ounces of bread. After that, roll call occurred next. Men would line up in rows of 10. They were forbidden to talk during roll call. The days would be long: 12-14 hours of work. The work was very hard, and often useless. They had to move heavy sand bags from one point to another, extract and carry heavy stones, and dig trenches. They would have one short lunch break and usually workers would faint returning back to work. If they fainted, they were beaten. When they were done working they would return back to their camp. The survivors would carry mens bodies who had died that day back to the camp too. Evening roll call was worst. If a prisoner tried to escape, all the prisoners would stand at attention at their roll-call place until he was retrieved. The evening roll call took hours, sometimes even 10 hours, before it is over. The evening roll call was also the moment chosen by the SS for the punishments and the hangings. Sometimes, after a hanging, all the prisoners had to march in front of the gallows to look at the hanged prisoner, as a warning. Dinner was some type of soup. Bedtime was five men in a bed with one blanket. Atrocities that occurred were extreme experiments on jews. They often resulted in death or permanent disabilities. I chose the picture above because it shows what concentration camps looked like in Nazi Germany.  They weren't very big and there were many of them close together. Everyone was required to wear the same thing; striped shirts and pants. They wore shoes that often didn't fit and were stolen by others.

I chose this picture to show what concentration camp members looked like. It seems that they are at a roll call. They are all wearing the same outfit. Their facial expressions are similar; tired and hopeless. This is significant because it shows dehumanization. They were no longer individuals, they were the same. They did not have names anymore, rather numbers.

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2 years ago
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2 years ago
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I chose this video because it gives a detailed description of what the average person encountered before being sent into the concentration camp itself. She talks about the process of undressing and getting all their hair cut off. She even gives insight about her conversation with a guard.