Sonnet

       Sonnets are one of the most famous types of poetry. It has been popularly used all the way back to when Shakespeare was around. A sonnet contains 14 lines, usually with two rhyming stanzas. They are known as a rhyming couplet at the end of a stanza. Traditionally, they are classified into groups based on the rhyme scheme. Sonnets also generally contain a volta, or turn.

Sonnet 123

No! Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change

Thy pyramids built up with newer might
To me are nothing novel, nothing strange;
They are but dressings of a former sight.
Our dates are brief, and therefore we admire
What thou dost foist upon us that is old;
And rather make them born to our desire,
Than think that we before have heard them told.
Thy registers and thee I both defy,
Not wondering at the present nor the past,
For thy records and what we see doth lie,
Made more or less by thy continual haste.
This I do vow and this shall ever be;
I will be true, despite thy scythe and thee.
-William Shakespeare

Sonnet