DAY OF THE DEAD

DIANA GARCIA, LYNN, KENIYA

Dia de los Muertos originated centuries ago in Mexico, where it is still widely celebrated to this day. the holiday is a blend of pre-Hispanic indigenous beliefs.

The Day of the Dead Falls November 1&2 of the year, coinciding with the cathoic holidays All Saints'day.

day of the day celebrates love ones

1) The Day of the Dead is celebrated in both public and private spaces. It is most celebrated in homes and graveyards.

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2)In homes, people create altars to honor their deceased loved ones. In some places it is common to allow guests to enter the house to view the altar.

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3)In graveyards, families clean the graves of their loved ones, which they then decorate with flowers, photos, candles, food and drinks. People stay up all night in the graveyards, socializing and telling funny stories about their dead ancestors. Musicians are hired to stroll through the graveyard, playing the favorite songs of the dead.

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4)The Day of the Dead (El Día de los Muertos in Spanish) is a Mexican and Mexican-American celebration of dead ancestors, which occurs on November 1 and November 2, coinciding with the similar Roman Catholic celebrations of All Saints Day and All Souls Day. While it is primarily viewed as a Mexican holiday, it is also celebrated in communities in the United States with large populations of Mexican-Americans, and to a lesser extent elsewhere in Latin America. Despite the morbid subject matter, this holiday is celebrated joyfully, and though it occurs at the same time as Halloween, All Saints Day, and All Souls Day, the mood of The Day of the Dead is much lighter, with the emphasis on celebrating and honoring the lives of the deceased, rather than fearing evil or malevolent spirits. The origins of the celebration of The Day of the Dead in Mexico can be traced back to the indigenous peoples of Latin America, such as the Aztecs, Mayans Purepecha, Nahua and Totonac.

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5)Rituals celebrating the lives of dead ancestors had been performed by these Mesoamerican civilizations for at least 3,000 years. It was common practice to keep skulls as trophies and display them during rituals to symbolize death and rebirth. The festival, which was to become El Día de los Muertos fell on the ninth month of the Aztec Solar Calendar, near the start of August, and was celebrated for the entire month. Festivities were presided over by the goddess Mictecacihuatl, known as the "Lady of the Dead". The festivities were dedicated to the celebration of children and the lives of dead relatives.

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6.When the Spanish Conquistadors arrived in Central America in the 15th century they were appalled at the indigenous pagan practices, and in an attempt to convert the locals to Catholicism moved the popular festival to the beginning of November to coincide with the Catholic All Saints and All Souls days. All Saints Day is the day after Halloween, which was in turn based on the earlier pagan ritual of Samhain, the Celtic day and feast of the dead. The Spanish combined their custom of Halloween with the similar Mesoamerican festival, creating The Day of the Dead.

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7.The souls of children are believed to return first on November 1, with adult spirits following on November 2. Plans for the festival are made throughout the year, including gathering the goods that will be offered to the dead. During the period of October 31 and November 2 families usually clean and decorate the graves. Some wealthier families build alters in their homes, but most simply visit the cemeteries where their loved ones are buried and decorate their graves with offends, or offerings. These include wreaths of marigold, which are thought to attract the souls of the dead toward the offerings, and toys brought for dead children (los angelitos, or little angels) and bottles of tequila, mezcal, pulque or atole for adults.

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A common symbol of the holiday is the skull, which celebrants represent in masks called calacas. A relative or friend often eats sugar skulls, inscribed with the names of the deceased on the forehead. Other special foods for El Día de los Muertos includes Pan de Muertos (bread of the dead), sweet egg bread made in many shapes, from plain rounds to skulls and rabbits.

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8)Rituals celebrating the lives of dead ancestors had been performed by these Mesoamerican civilizations for at least 3,000 years. It was common practice to keep skulls as trophies and display them during rituals to symbolize death and rebirth. The festival, which was to become El Día de los Muertos fell on the ninth month of the Aztec Solar Calendar, near the start of August, and was celebrated for the entire month. Festivities were presided over by the goddess Mictecacihuatl, known as the "Lady of the Dead". The festivities were dedicated to the celebration of children and the lives of dead relatives.

9)When the Spanish Conquistadors arrived in Central America in the 15th century they were appalled at the indigenous pagan practices, and in an attempt to convert the locals to Catholicism moved the popular festival to the beginning of November to coincide with the Catholic All Saints and All Souls days. All Saints Day is the day after Halloween, which was in turn based on the earlier pagan ritual of Samhain, the Celtic day and feast of the dead. The Spanish combined their custom of Halloween with the similar Mesoamerican festival, creating The Day of the Dead.

10)Because Day of the Dead, which takes place on November 2nd, follows Halloween, some people might conclude that Dia de los Muertos is an evil holiday in which Mexicans praise death. Couldn't be further from reality, as we rejoice the lives of those we love and who are no longer on Earth. We also celebrate with huge parties to give thanks to our own lives and those who are still around us. While I see Halloween as a time to dress up like characters in horror films, Day of the Dead for me is like going back in time in which I remember the past while also dressing up in traditional Mexican dresses and rebozos

It's10) It's during this time that I can share my affinity for Mexican culture and tradition with other Day of the Dead devotees, as well as with newcomers. As you can see, our holiday traditions are all relative. Merry Day of the Dead!

11)Well, they do. For starters, Mexicans have been honoring Day of the Dead, (or All Souls Day and All Saints Day as it's also known by Catholics) for thousands of years. It's based on two principles in particular: One, it celebrates the lives of people who've passed away by luring them with gifts so they return to visit us; and two, it's about reminiscing with friends and family, among brightly-colored decorations such as l 1) Rituals celebrating the lives of dead ancestors had been performed by these Mesoamerican civilizations for at least 3,000 years. It was common practice to keep skulls as trophies and display them during rituals to symbolize death and rebirth. The festival, which was to become El Día de los Muertos fell on the ninth month of the Aztec Solar Calendar, near the start of August, and was celebrated for the entire month. Festivities were presided over by the goddess Mictecacihuatl, known as the "Lady of the Dead". The festivities were dedicated to the celebration of children and the lives of dead relatives.

2) 12) When the Spanish Conquistadors arrived in Central America in the 15th century they were appalled at the indigenous pagan practices, and in an attempt to convert the locals to Catholicism moved the popular festival to the beginning of November to coincide with the Catholic All Saints and All Souls days. All Saints Day is the day after Halloween, which was in turn based on the earlier pagan ritual of Samhain, the Celtic day and feast of the dead. The Spanish combined their custom of Halloween with the similar Mesoamerican festival, creating The Day of the Dead.

3) 13)Because Day of the Dead, which takes place on November 2nd, follows Halloween, some people might conclude that Dia de los Muertos is an evil holiday in which Mexicans praise death. Couldn't be further from reality, as we rejoice the lives of those we love and who are no longer on Earth. We also celebrate with huge parties to give thanks to our own lives and those who are still around us. While I see Halloween as a time to dress up like characters in horror films, Day of the Dead for me is like going back in time in which I remember the past while also dressing up in traditional Mexican dresses and rebozos.

4) 14)It's during this time that I can share my affinity for Mexican culture and tradition with other Day of the Dead devotees, as well as with newcomers. As you can see, our holiday traditions are all relative. Merry Day of the Dead!

15) Well, they do. For starters, Mexicans have been honoring Day of the Dead, (or All Souls Day and All Saints Day as it's also known by Catholics) for thousands of years. It's based on two principles in particular: One, it celebrates the lives of people who've passed away by luring them with gifts so they return to visit us; and two, it's about reminiscing with friends and family, among brightly-colored decorations such as luminous marigolds, strands of hanging papel picado, and ornate calacas (spirited skeletons).

uminous marigolds, strands of hanging papel picado, and ornate calacas (spirited skeletons

Halloween Facts:

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The word “witch” comes from the Old English wince, meaning “wise woman.” In fact, Wiccan was highly respected people at one time. According to popular belief, witches held one of their two main meetings, or sabots, on Halloween night.

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Norm Craven, who broke the world record in 1993 with an 836 lb. pumpkin, grew the largest pumpkin ever measured.

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The first known mention of trick-or-treating in print in North America occurred in 1927 in Blackie, Alberta, Canada

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Black and orange are typically associated with Halloween. Orange is a symbol of strength and endurance and, along with brown and gold, stands for the harvest and autumn. Black is typically a symbol of death and darkness and acts as a reminder that Halloween once was a festival that marked the boundaries between life and death.

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Ireland is typically believed to be the birthplace of Halloween

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Mexico celebrates the Days of the Dead (Días de los Muertos) on the Christian holidays All Saints’ Day (November 1) and All Souls’ Day (November 2) instead of Halloween. The townspeople dresses up like ghouls and parade down the street.

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Halloween is thought to have originated around 4000 B.C., which means Halloween has been around for over 6,000 years.

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Halloween celebrations in Hong Kong are known as Yue Land or the “Festival of the Hungry Ghosts” during which fires are lit and food and gifts are offered to placate potentially angry ghosts who might be looking for revenge.

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The Village Halloween parade in New York City is the largest Halloween parade in the United States. The parade includes 50,000 participants and draws over 2 million spectators.

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In many countries, such as France and Australia, Halloween is seen as an unwanted and overly commercial American influence

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Hallowmas is a three-day Catholic holiday where saints are honored and people pray for the recently deceased. At the start of the 11th century, it was decreed by the pope that it would last from Oct. 31 (All Hallow's Eve) until Nov. 2, most likely because that celebrated and the church was trying to convert the pagans.

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"All Hallow's Eve" then evolved into "All Hallow's Even," and by the 18th century it was commonly referred to as "Halloween."

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Black cats, spiders, and bats are all Halloween symbols because of their spooky history and ties to Wiccans. All three were thought to be the familiars of witches in the middle ages, and are often associated with bad luck. Bats are even further connected to Halloween by the ancient Samhain ritual of building a bonfire, which drove away insects and attracted bats.

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Invented by George Renninger, a candy maker at the Wunderle Candy Company of Philadelphia in the 1880s, Candy Corn was originally called "butter cream candies" and "chicken feed" since back then, corn was commonly used as food for livestock (they even had a rooster on the candy boxes).

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It had no association with Halloween or fall, and was sold seasonally from March to November. After World War II, advertisers began marketing it as a special Halloween treat due to its colors and ties to the fall harvest.

halloween

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