Owner and Director of the United States Department of State licensed organization, the SJC Group Inc., Peter M. Liota serves in the executive protective services industry. Maintaining over 25 years of experience in law enforcement and private security, Mr. Liota is a former United States marine who has reoriented his skills to conduct protective operations. With an established reputation of success in high-pressure situations, Peter Liota has provided personal protection for several of the world’s foreign leaders, international dignitaries, corporate identities, and celebrity clients. As the Director of the SJC Group, he has passed and administered extensive background checks, such that his company is distinguished among the highest caliber personal protection agentcies in the nation.

A retired New York City Detective, Peter Liota holds an impressive post-secondary training portfolio, including passing the New York Police Department’s specialized protection security training, the dignitary protection course, the defensive driving course, and several surveillance detection courses with the law enforcement institution. Mr. Liota is a certified practitioner of first aid, CPR, and automated external defibrillation devices. Over the years, he has been recognized as a team leader, a project manager, a close protection agent, and a personal protection specialist, among other titles.

Peter Liota graduated from St. John’s University where he received his Bachelor of Science in Business Management and Criminal Justice in 1988. Continuing to engage within his community, he participates with the New York Police Department’s Police Athletic League and is a member of the St. John’s University’s Indian Society, an organization seeking to promote the ideals of unity and brotherhood through the support of underprivileged individuals.

Peter Liota’s Advice for Seeking First Aid Certification

Certified in First Aid, CPR, and the use of an AED, Peter Liota often directs individuals about the steps toward certification in these areas. As Peter Liota explains, individuals can usually find first aid training courses at local fire, police, and EMT departments. Often, their websites will list the dates of training sessions, but interested parties can also call. Some individuals have received certification in certain aspects of first aid online at websites like or, but these courses do not provide the same hands-on practice as other programs.

All departments will have a slightly different training course and the amount of training necessary depends on the certification sought. For example, CPR is a separate certification but many training programs roll them into one course. Most courses require a written examination and a practical skills test for certification, but they will provide practice quizzes before the actual test date. Written portions will contain multiple-choice questions. Programs generally demand a score of 75 or higher to pass.

Peter Liota: The Police Athletic League of New York City

An executive protection specialist with SJC Group, Inc., Peter Liota has served in the United States Marine Corps and the New York City Police Department. During his spare time, Liota volunteers with the Police Athletic League of New York City (PAL NYC).

For nearly a century, PAL NYC has aided the city's children. Developed by Police Commissioner Arthur Woods and Captain John Sweeney in 1914, this group was formed to prevent youths from delinquency by offering them a safe and structured environment. Although it originally involved police officers closing down streets for unsupervised play, PAL NYC eventually became a large scale organization with numerous endeavors. Moreover, its “cops helping kids helping communities” concept has spread across the country.

Today, PAL NYC features options for children aged three to 19. Head Start classes, day care centers, after school programs, and summer day camps account are a few of the services available through this group. Every year, more than 17,000 youths learn discipline, self-esteem, and leadership by playing flag football, soccer, hockey, and other PAL NYC-sponsored sports.

Peter Liota: Staffing an Event and Providing Training

With more than 20 years of law enforcement experience, Peter Liota specializes in intelligence analysis, protective services, and team leadership. Public events require coordinated planning efforts, including risk management, staff and crowd communication, and crowd management. Organizers must ensure that event staff members are properly trained to react to both planned and emergency situations.

To determine the number of staff needed at an event, consider the event's size, the number of responsibilities and tasks that need to be carried out, and the crowd's anticipated behavior. In addition, factor in the timing of the event, both in terms of its duration and seasonal factors, such as extreme weather conditions.

Volunteer staff members may not understand the necessity of crowd control or how to adequately do it, which makes training sessions vital. The better the communication and procedures in place, the more likely an emergency situation will be handled satisfactorily. Establish expectations and rules upfront, and event staff will be better equipped to manage crowds and help to pull off a successful event.

Finding and Using an Automated External Defibrillator

A retired New York City detective, Peter Liota joined SJC Group, Inc., more than two decades ago. Offering expertise in law enforcement and private security as an executive protection professional, Peter Liota also maintains certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use of automated external defibrillators.

Used in situations of cardiac emergencies, an automated external defibrillator (AED) improves a victim’s survival rate greatly when administered as soon as an incident occurs. For every minute delayed, a person’s survival rate diminishes by 10 percent. An AED is commonly located in public areas, such as sports arenas, airports, office buildings, and educational facilities. Police officers and ambulance crews also have direct access to the device.

Currently, there are four companies distributing 11 models. Depending on the type, the tool may be semi or fully automated. User-friendly, an AED prompts users on the screen and through audio technology on steps to properly administer electric shocks to the heart. Because electricity is used to restore normal heart rhythm, the person helping with defibrillation should make sure the area surrounding the victim and the exposed chest are dry. Thereafter, he or she can apply the sticky pads with electrodes to the person’s chest as directed by the device and follow the instructions.