Quantified Helf

From healthcare to selfcare - Top 5 wearables
by EOO Sweden

Withings Smart Body Analyzer

Functionality:

Body scanning as well as weight scale. Measures your heart rate. Detects carbon monoxide and checks temperature. Rich app eco-system and fitness data visualization.

Pros:

Collects a wide range of fitness data. Big family of software applications.

Cons:

High price for the average consumer. Limited openness for developers to build third party applications.

Cost:

150 euro

Quantified Helf application:

Immediately useful in physical therapy and when people aim to lose weight with the help of a personal trainer. The body analyzer already tells the individual an abundance of personal fitness data to the individual user (quantified self), and with very little effort a service could be built where the same information is sent to the designated professional whose job it is to help facilitate improved wellness (quantified helf). This convenient exchange of information that otherwise require physical visits to a clinic makes the whole process easy, and professional advice can be given much quicker and more efficiently - empowering selfcare with qualified support.

Withings Blood Pressure Monitor

Functionality:

Measures blood pressure and heart rate, displaying the data on an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch. Records your historical data and makes it accessible to you at an instant via the app. Send your health information to your designated doctor by the tap of a button on your smart phone.

Pros:

Convenient and accessible monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate for the selfcaring individual - eliminating the need to seek healthcare for regular checkups. Easy sharing of health data with preferred physician.

Cons:

Only compatible with Apple devices.

Cost:

80 euro

Quantified Helf application:

This device may or may not be as precise as those used clinically within the healthcare system, but is more than accurate enough for gathering daily information and provide insights to the patient without having to visit a hospital. When the blood pressure or heart rate starts to reach worrying levels, the pressure monitor can notify not only the selfcaring patient but also the appropriate physician - and only then is a hospital visit needed for further measuring. This device can effectively reduce the patient's need to interact with the healthcare system when that is not necessary, leading to a better quality of life and reduced costs.

Fitbit Force

Functionality:

Tracks steps, distance, stairs climbed, calories burned and active minutes. Has a digital display that reveals your fitness statistics as well as time, and will in the future through software updates reveal notifications coming from your smart phone. Also tracks your sleep and is compatible with both Apple iOS and Android devices through wireless syncing, as well as standard computers.

Pros:

The most all-rounded fitness tracker in the bracelet category. Tracks several different metrics and has gone through several iterations by a by now very established company. Big community of users and above all accessible to third-party developers through good APIs.

Cons:

Not the most social fitness experience compared to competitors like Jawbone UP24 and Misfit Shine. Water-resistant, but not water proof. The armband is a technical compromise, not a perfection, and can be uncomfortable depending on your type of activity.

Cost:

130 US Dollars

Quantified Helf application:

The Fitbit Force is the most generally applicable device for general tracking of anyone's physical health. It will give anyone a much improved understanding on one's activity, sleep and burned calories. Whether this is given to a professional athlete or a person in need of considerable physical therapy, the Force will generate insights that can empower the individual to change and improve their own behaviours. Not only that, its app(s) are fun to use and built to increase motivation - which ought to make this bracelet into a given part of any physical wellness training. In conjunction with services for physical therapists, trainers and others to monitor the activity of users it would make for a transformative experience built on accurate fitness data and professional feedback.

Basis B1

Functionality:

Captures heart rate, your motion and burned calories based on type of activity, advanced sleep tracking including REM, and - they claim - perspiration as well as skin temperature. It contains the most advanced sensors available in any fitness tracker today that's geared towards the consumer market.

Pros:

It tracks more than any other wearable fitness device and can give more information to professionals to use in their work. It is a premium product for committed users.

Cons:

Arguably expensive and a product that may fall into the trap of trying to do too many things at once with the risk of doing none of them well. It is also a proprietary platform, meaning that it provides limited opportunity for others to build third-party apps or services that work well with the device

Cost:

199 US Dollars

Quantified Helf application:

The Basis B1 will serve two clear quantified helf purposes: high level athlete training and monitoring of patients with more severe complications. In case of the former, this wearable device will paint the broadest possible picture in the most convenient way available about your physical health - enabling the pro athlete to understand more about he or she can further optimize the training for improved performance.

In the latter case, this device may serve to make patients whose health must be monitored for signs of worsened conditions more mobile, as the Basis B1 can track a lot of data that otherwise confines the patient to a hospital setting. Maybe it can enable people to live at home that without it are bound to spend time within the healthcare system, thereby making life more enjoyable and also saving on healthcare costs.

Misfit Shine

Functionality:

Counts your steps, distance traveled, level of activity, calories burned and sleep patterns - in the most simplistic form factor on the current market. The Misfit Shine, brought to life through crowdfunding, is the epitomy of streamlined fitness tracking that leaves a minimal footprint.

Pros:

Simple. Water proof. Battery lasts in excess of a month and holds data for weeks without syncing. Made out of brushed aluminium and equipped with LED-indicators, that show your progress as well as a clock. The device can be worn in a multitude of ways - on your wrist, as a necklace, a clip-on pin and more. It has also has its own social network where you can compare your (proprietary) fitness score to others and compete with friends for added motivation. Compatible with both Android and iOS through wireless syncing.

Cons:

Too simplistic. No display. Limited in the types of fitness data it tracks, and as of yet no available APIs for developers to use in building their own apps for the platform (though Misfit has proclaimed that such functions are on their swift way). The Misfit Shine may be simply to simple for some users who want to know more about their wellness than what the device can tell.

Cost:

120 US dollars

Quantified Helf application:

The Shine can be elegantly deployed within professional wellness organizations and healthcare since it is not only durable, holds battery charge for a long time and can be easily sterilized given it's water proof metal body - but because it is subtle in its design and not very obtrusive at all. People who are less than keen on wearing a bright-colored armband with flashing lights will find that the Shine makes less of an impact, and therefore they are more inclined to continue wearing it over time.

In addition, the Shine - giving its form factor and long-lasting battery - can be effectively strapped to anything that moves and track data. If one were interested in quantifiying how much a given piece of training equipment is being used at a gym, tie a Shine on it and start tracking. For experimental prototyping within quantified helf, this device makes for a perfect starting tool before more exact tools need to be made.

Quantified Helf