Running the Numbers

Created by Chris Jordan, Running the Numbers is a collections of art pieces that depict how Americans create, consume, and interact with the world around them.



Denali Denial, 2006
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Depicts 24,000 logos from the GMC Yukon Denali, equal to six weeks of sales of that model SUV in 2004.



Jet Trails, 2007
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Depicts 11,000 jet trails, equal to the number of commercial flights in the US every eight hours.



Cell Phones, 2007
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Depicts 426,000 cell phones, equal to the number of cell phones retired in the US every day.



Handguns, 2007
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Depicts 29,569 handguns, equal to the number of gun-related deaths in the US in 2004.



Plastic Bags, 2007
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Depicts 60,000 plastic bags, the number used in the US every five seconds.



Prison Uniforms, 2007
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Depicts 2.3 million folded prison uniforms, equal to the number of Americans incarcerated in 2005.



Cans Seurat, 2007
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Depicts 106,000 aluminum cans, the number used in the US every thirty seconds.



Ben Franklin, 2007
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Depicts 125,000 one-hundred dollar bills ($12.5 million), the amount our government spent every hour on the war in Iraq in 2007.



Shipping Containers, 2007
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Depicts 38,000 shipping containers, the number of containers processed through American ports every twelve hours.



Barbie Dolls, 2008
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Depicts 32,000 Barbies, equal to the number of elective breast augmentation surgeries performed monthly in the US in 2006.



Plastic Bottles, 2007
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Depicts two million plastic beverage bottles, the number used in the US every five minutes.



Cigarettes, 2007
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Depicts 65,000 cigarettes, equal to the number of American teenagers under age eighteen who become addicted to cigarettes every month.

Credit: Chris Jordan