Scott Fish (Developer)

Developer of Large-Scale Retail Shops

About Scott Fish Developer

Accomplished real estate developer Scott Fish has headed his own company, UP Development, for a number of years. There, he and his team of professionals specialize in acquiring, turning around, and reimagining large retail centers, shopping malls, and similar properties. Over the years, UP Development has designed and built locations anchored by leading retailers such as Target, Walmart, and Meijer. A native of Michigan, Scott Fish currently works as a developer in Florida and Tennessee, and he has managed projects in neighboring states, as well.


Mr. Fish is currently engaged in several high-profile endeavors. For the Orlando Fashion Square Mall, for instance, he renewed leases with Dillard's and JCPenney; other new transformations include an on-site hotel with rooftop swimming pool and the addition of a Panera Bread and BJ's Brew House. Among the other tenants that might call the Orlando Fashion Square Mall home are Red Robin, Olive Garden, and Outback Steak House. For additional information about current or past projects, or to read more about Mr. Fish’s background in the industry, please visit his company's website at UPDevelopment.com.

Home Depot Lowers Power Costs and Emissions Using Green Technology

Based in Franklin, Tennessee, Scott Fish owns and operates UP Development LLC, a retail developer placing popular nationwide-brand retail shops in commercial areas throughout the Southeast. For more than 17 years, developer Scott Fish has worked with financial institutions and retail chains to create workable solutions for all involved, establishing relationships with companies such as Lowe’s, Publix, Target, and Home Depot.

Home Depot aids the sustainability of the planet - and cuts costs at the same time - by using an advanced green technology. The company, along with many others, has partnered with Bloom Energy, a fuel cell technology company, to create its own electricity on-site at its stores. According to an article by CNBC, the retailer uses Bloom Energy Servers to power 140 of its stores as well as forklifts at two distribution centers.

The servers are housed inside containers about the size of a parking space, with the fuel cells contained within. The fuel cells use an electrochemical process to convert fuel such as natural gas into electricity. The resulting energy is off-grid and emits fewer atmospheric pollutants. Home Depot has noted that the use of this technology in select stores has cut electricity costs by 15 percent to 20 percent at each location. Since 2004 use of the fuel cell technology has reduced carbon dioxide emissions by 50 million pounds, a figure equal to removing 4,800 cars from the roads.

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