Panama
By Michael Rivera

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica.Web

Religion

Roman Catholicism is the religion of four-fifths of Panamanians. The number of Protestants grew rapidly in the late 20th century, especially among Pentecostal churches. There is also a long-standing Protestant tradition within the African population of Bocas del Toro province and among Indian groups and West Indian immigrants. Three synagogues serve the Jewish population. Some Panamanians practice the syncretic religion Santería, a combination of Roman Catholic and traditional West African beliefs and customs. Panama’s constitution guarantees freedom of worship. 

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica.Web

                                         Language

Spanish is the official language of Panama and is spoken by the vast majority of the people. Although fewer than one-tenth of the people speak American Indian languages, all of Panama’s Indian groups preserve their native tongues, and many Indians also speak Spanish. Most Panamanians from West Indian backgrounds speak English, which is also commonly taught in schools. Small minority of people speak Japanese, Hebrew, Arabic, Eastern Yiddish and Korean.

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica. Web

                                         Education

Elementary education is compulsory and free for children between ages 6 and 15. One-third of Panamanians age 25 and older have not completed primary school, yet it is estimated that nine-tenths of the adult population (age 15 and older) is literate. The institutions of higher education include the state-run University of Panamá (founded 1935) and the privately operated University of Santa María la Antigua (1965), both in Panama City; the University of Panamá also has branches in several provinces. A polytechnic university was founded in Panama City in 1981. In addition, some U.S. and other foreign universities offer branch programs in Panama.

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica. Web

                                  Economy

Nearly three-fourths of Panama’s gross domestic product (GDP) is generated by the service sector—a greater proportion than in any other Latin American country—and services employ the majority of the workforce. Services have grown mainly because of offshore banking and canal traffic; public administration and other services are also important. Agriculture and fishing account for less than one-tenth of the GDP but nearly one-fifth of the workforce.

Prior to the 1990s U.S. forces stationed in Panama supported approximately 5 percent of the GDP. The Panamanian government, recognizing that the U.S. troop withdrawal would remove hundreds of millions of dollars from the national economy, has attempted to compensate by redeveloping formerly U.S.-controlled properties, including prime real estate in Panama City. The government has also promoted ecotourism and the repair of rail and road systems. In recent years large investments from China, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as from the United States, have helped boost economic growth.

                         Source: Encyclopedia Britannica. Web

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