Insomnia

Insomnia - Sleep disorder characterized by difficulty falling and/or staying asleep.

Some symptoms of insomnia include

  • Trouble falling asleep
  • Waking up too early
  • Difficulty falling back asleep upon wakening
  • Feeling tired upon wakening

Myth - Watching TV or movies help you wind down and go to sleep faster

Most people think that watching TV/movies or be on your phone/laptop will wind you down so its easier to fall asleep, but that's not the case. Electronics actually stimulate the brain, the light and sometimes noise of the device can actually reduce your brains melatonin levels, which helps you control your day-night cycle. During the night a person's melatonin levels increase drastically as your body will become less alert. It is important to make sure your melatonin levels at night are very high, if you have trouble sleeping and would like noise then play some music at a very low volume as this plays a very low factor to a person's melatonin level.

There are many different types of insomnia but they are categorized into two types

The two major types of insomnia

  • Acute
  • Chronic

Acute Insomnia

Acute Insomnia is also known as short-term insomnia, such as night being able to sleep for a night or a week or two.

Causes of acute insomnia are

  • Life-stress
  • Illness
  • Emotional/Physical discomfort
  • Environment
  • Medication

Chronic Insomnia

Chronic Insomnia is known as long-term insomnia, this is caused when insomnia is laster longer than three weeks to a month

Causes of chronic insomnia are

  • Depression and/or anxiety
  • Chronic stress
  • Pain or discomfort at night

For more information on insomnia visit sleepfoundation.org

Comment Stream

2 years ago
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"Melatonin and Sleep." <i>National Sleep Foundation</i>. Sleep Foundation, 1 Jan. 2014. Web. 28 Jan. 2015.
Smith, Micheal. "Insomnia Myth and Facts." <i>Living with Insomnia</i>. WebMD, 8 May 2014. Web. 28 Jan. 2015.
Chanin, Louis. "Insomnia (Chronic and Acute)." <i>Sleep Disorders Health Center</i>. WebMD, 21 Aug. 2014. Web. 28 Jan. 2015.