The Great life of Aaron Copland

Aaron Copland was an American composer, composition teacher, writer, and later in his career a conductor of his own and other American music. Aaron was born on November 14, 1900. in  Brooklyn, NY.son of immigrant parents from Poland and Lithuania, Copland was exposed to concert music up through the Impressionists at an early age while growing up in New York. He studied harmony, counterpoint, and sonata form at the Boy'son of immigrant parents from Poland and Lithuania, Copland was exposed to concert music up through the Impressionists at an early age while growing up in New York. He studied harmony, counterpoint, and sonata form at the Boy's High School, and saved enough money to take off for Paris at the age of 20. There he studied with the legendary Nadia Boulanger, teacher of a generation of American composers. In Europe, he met avant-garde composers, began to find his love for jazz.

1932—First visit to Mexico, arranged by Carlos Chavez, which includes first all-Copland program (organized by Chavez at the Conservatorio Nacional de Music on September 2nd: Two Pieces for String Quartet, Piano Variations, Two Pieces for Chorus, and Music for the Theatre); joins the Board of Directors of the League of Composers; joins a social and professional collective called Young Composers’ Group (including Arthur Berger, Henry Brant, Lehman Engel, Vivian Fine, Bernard Herrmann, Elie Siegmeister, and others).

Copland, to all intents and purposes, retired from composition in 1965, although short pieces occasionally came from the shop. This was a combination of the public's rejection of his latest works (including Inscapes, one of the great postwar American scores) and of the oedipal acting out of younger composers, who essentially ignored him.





In 1920, he set out for Paris, modernism's home in the years between the wars. Among the many vital legacies of his stay in Paris were his association with his teacher and mentor Nadia Boulanger; a growing interest in popular idioms; and the insight that there was as yet no American counterpart to the national styles being created by composers from France, Russia, and Spain. He became determined to create, in his words, "a naturally American strain of so-called serious music."

The son of immigrant parents from Poland and Lithuania, Copland was exposed to concert music up through the Impressionists at an early age while growing up in New York. (One of his teachers prevented him from glancing at Charles Ives' Concord Sonata so he wouldn't be "contaminated" by it.) He studied harmony, counterpoint, and sonata form at the Boy's High School, and saved enough money to take off for Paris at the age of 20. There he studied with the legendary Nadia Boulanger, teacher of a generation of American composers. In Europe, he met avant-garde composers, began to be interested in jazz, and decided to create a uniquely American sound in his works. This ideal began to be realized in his pieces of the 1930s and 1940s which include the ballets Billy the Kid (1938), Rodeo (1942), and Appalachian Spring (1943-1944), and the orchestral scores Music for Radio (Prairie Journal) (1937), An Outdoor Overture (1938), Quiet City (1939), Lincoln Portrait (1942), and the famous Fanfare for the Common Man (1942).During this time, Copland also created original and innovative scores for several films: Serlin's The City (1939),


Basic information- 1. Aaron Copland was an American composer, composition teacher, writer, and later in his career a conductor of his own and other American music.

 2. Aaron was born on November 14, 1900

 3. Aaron died December 2, 1990 in Sleepy Hollow what are you doing


links cope and paste

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/aaron-copland/about-the-composer/475/

https://soundcloud.com/festine/copland

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/celebrity/aaron_copland/biography.php

http://www.coplandhouse.org/aaron-copland/timeline/

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