Eleanor Roosevelt

"Eleanor Roosevelt." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 23 Apr. 2015. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_Roosevelt>.

        Eleanor Roosevelt was the longest serving First Lady, she helped the United States even after her husband died. Eleanor was a hard working woman, she was a feminist who fought for woman's rights. She help personal conferences to draw attention to the plight of working women. She became active in a woman's committee to keep FDR's interest in politics alive. She worked for what she believed in, and worked for what she thought was right.

World war 1

  Eleanor had several different jobs during WW1. She had many fundraising jobs, she helped prepare meals for men who were sent off to fight, she "implored the Wilson Administration’s Interior Secretary to create a commission which conducted an investigation with the intention of improving the facility’s services."

World war 2

Eleanor Roosevelt had a role during the war, she had to watch over her sons who were servicemen, learn new things in case of an emergency , participate in air raids, and make sure the Whit House was running smoothly. "She planted a victory garden, and made frequent radio appeals for donations of money and blood to the Red Cross. She kept track on Adolf Hitler, and in return they would attack her on his broadcasts." She had to keep close watch over herself, and others.

How she helped FDR

In 1921 FDR was paralyzed leaving Eleanor with big responsibilities. "She helped out with FDR's medical care, and Eleanor supported his intentions to someday return to national politics." Later someone else started helping FDR so Eleanor could write, read, make new friends, and pursue another job. These jobs included, "The Women's City Club of New York, board of director, City Planning Department chair, The Women's Trade Union League, Women's Division of the New York State Democratic Committee, The League of Women Voters, World Peace Movement and Bok Peace Prize Committee, Todhunter School for Girls, New York City, New York, co-owner, and a Writer, Lecturer, Radio Show Commentator."

   "First Lady Biography: Eleanor Roosevelt." Eleanor Roosevelt Biography. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=33>. copyright © The National First Ladies' Library, 330-452-0876 Museum/Saxton McKinley House 331 S. Market Ave. Canton, Ohio 44702 Education and Research Center 205 S. Market Ave. Canton, Ohio 44702

The New Deal

Eleanor Roosevelt supported FDR's idea for the New Deal, although her focus was based on her experiences in the reform movement. Eleanor Roosevelt kept her interest in all of the New Deal by serving as a liaison between the citizens who needed help and the best programs to answer their needs. She fought for equality for women, African- Americans, and young people. She supported private charities, and donated her own private funds to the American Friends Service Committee. As the first First Lady to sponsor White House conferences, she hosted several that focused specifically on meeting the needs of women. She showed her opposition to segregation laws when she came to the Southern Conference for Human Welfare. She helped others because so many had lost everything from the Great Depression, and she really felt she needed to do something about that.

All about Eleanor Roosevelt

   She worked for what she thought was right, and through that she was able to accomplish many things. She was a great person with a kind soul, and was always thinking of others needs before herself. Even after FDR had passed away she still maintained the role of First Lady. She was the longest serving First Lady, and that lasted 12 years! While leaving a hair appointment in New York City she was run over by a car, she was advised to see a specialist as her general health declined and was diagnosed with aplastic anemia. She developed bone marrow tuberculosis, recurring from a 1919 infection, and died at her apartment.

This is a picture of the victory garden that Eleanor Roosevelt planted.

"Sustainable Urban Gardens." Sustainable Urban Gardens. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://www.sacgardens.org/sustainability/victoryGardensHistory.html>.

Works cited

"Eleanor Roosevelt." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 23 Apr. 2015. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_Roosevelt>.

"First Lady Biography: Eleanor Roosevelt." Eleanor Roosevelt Biography. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=33>. copyright © The National First Ladies' Library, 330-452-0876 Museum/Saxton McKinley House 331 S. Market Ave. Canton, Ohio 44702 Education and Research Center 205 S. Market Ave. Canton, Ohio 44702

"Sustainable Urban Gardens." Sustainable Urban Gardens. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://www.sacgardens.org/sustainability/victoryGardensHistory.html>.

Woolner, David. "Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute." Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://newdeal.feri.org/feri/>.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum." Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/>.

"Women on 20s - Results." Women on 20s - Results. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://www.womenon20s.org/>.

"The White House." The White House. The White House, n.d. Web. 12 May 2015. <http://www.whitehouse.gov/>.