Six Responses to Suffering that Fail to Satisfy

Kushner identifies and examines six of the most commonplace responses to suffering. It is your responsibility to help your classmates better understand Kushner's argument for why the response you were assigned fails to offer a satisfactory answer to the question of "Why do bad things happen to good people?"


Your group will be responsible for responding by addressing the following information:

1. The class' opinion on the response. Respectfully go through the opinions of your classmates. Begin to organize the responses into categories (agree/disagree) and identify some of the questions/comments your classmates made in response to the assigned quote. Summarize your findings to the class.

2. Kushner's argument about why this particularly response fails to offer a satisfactory response to suffering. Go back through Kushner's argument in the text. Provide examples with page numbers from the book about how Kushner challenges this response.

3. The theological implications of this response. Explore how this quote would inform a person's image of God. How would this type of thinking inform a person's worldview?

4. A disucssion question for the class in response to the quote you were assigned. In formulating your question, consider: What questions remain for you after reading Kushner's arguments? Did one of your classmates raise a question that could be reframed in light of Kushner's argument?

5. Include at least one piece of media (image/song/poem/movie link) that connects to this common place response.

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5 months ago
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Station 3: 1. The class had a split decision. They agree that God has a plan, but they are saying they don't think that God will kill innocent people, or suffering.
2. People find this explanation comforting because some people see the their "suffering as a contribution to a great work of art designed by God Himself may be seen, not only as tolerable burden, but even as a privilege" (22). He challenges this idea by saying, "For all its compassion it too is based in large measure on wishful thinking" (22). It is trying to accept hypothetical solutions to real problems.
3. This quote would most definitely change a persons view on God. God has given each one of us a different path to follow. God has no involvement in how our lives get intertwined and what happens in sequence. Our lives are determined by our actions nothing more, we determine our own fate, and have complete control over our lives.
4. Does the end justify the means?
5. https://world.wng.org/2016/06/an_intertwining

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