Cardiomyopathy
by: Imani Beard
pd.9  3/9/15

This is a condition in which a ventricle has become enlarged, thickened, or stiffened. It results in the heart having a reduced ability to pump blood- the abnormality of the heart muscle itself.

There are two types of disorders:  Dilated and Hypertrophic.

Dilated: the heart's inability to supply the body with enough blood — dilated cardiomyopathy can also contribute to irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias), blood clots or sudden death. The condition affects people of all ages, including infants and children.

SYMPTOMS:

  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath (dyspnea) when you're active or lying down
  • Reduced ability to exercise
  • Swelling (edema) in your legs, ankles and feet
  • Swelling of your abdomen (ascites)

RISK FACTORS

Dilated cardiomyopathy most commonly occurs in men, ages 20 to 60. Other risk factors include:

  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Damage to the heart muscle from a heart attack
  • Family history of dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Alcoholism
  • Certain chemotherapy drugs and radiation for treating cancer
  • Cocaine use
  • Viral or bacterial infections of the heart muscle
  • Metabolic disorders, such as thyroid disease or diabetes
  • Diseases that can damage the heart, including hemochromatosis and sarcoidosis
  • Obesity
  • Nutritional deficiencies of essential vitamins and minerals, such as selenium
  • Inflammation of heart muscle from immune system disorders, such as lupus
  • Metals and other toxic compounds, such as lead, mercury and arsenic
  • Neuromuscular disorders, such as muscular dystrophy
  • HIV infection

                                         PRESCRIPTION for CARDIOMYOPATHY

Prescription ACE Inhibitor: Lisinopril (Prinivil), Captopril

Diuretic: Furosemide (Lasix)

Heart medication: Amiodarone (Cordarone), Digoxin (Lanoxin)

Statin: Simvastatin (Zocor), Atorvastatin (Lipitor)

Other treatments: Metoprolol (Lopressor), Carvedilol (Coreg), Spironolactone (Aldactone), Valsartan (Diovan) Self-treatmentAspirin (Ecotrin)Also common

Devices: Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, Cardiac pacemaker

Procedures: Cardiac catheterization, Revascularization, Coronary artery bypass surgery

Other treatments: Anti-arrhythmic agent, Heart transplantation Specialists

Primary care provider (PCP): Prevents, diagnoses, and treats diseases.

Radiologist: Uses images to diagnose and treat disease within the body.

Transplant surgeon: Transfers an organ from one body to another.

Cardiologist: Specializes in heart disorders.

Cardiothoracic surgeon: Surgically treats diseases affecting organs inside the chest.

Emergency medicine doctor: Treats patients in the emergency department

Hypertrophic

heart walls (muscle) are much thicker (hypertrophied)

RISK FACTORS:

is most often passed down through families (inherited). It is thought to result from defects in the genes that control heart muscle growth.

SYMPTOMS:

TREATMENTS:
  • Medicines to treat the abnormal rhythm
  • Blood thinners to reduce the risk of blood clots (if the arrhythmia is due to atrial fibrillation)
  • A permanent pacemaker to control the heartbeat
  • An implanted defibrillator that recognizes life-threatening heart rhythms and sends an electrical pulse to stop them. Sometimes a defibrillator is placed, even if the patient has not had an arrhythmia but is at high risk for a deadly arrhythmia (for example, if the heart muscle is very sick or the patient has a relative who has died suddenly).

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