Women's Rights
By: Christie, Emily, and Natalie

This report was printed soon after the Seneca Falls Convention held in Seneca Falls, New York, in July 1848, the first woman's rights convention of its kind to be held in the United States. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott organized the conference. The Seneca Falls Convention was partly the result of Mott being snubbed at the World's Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1840. The discrimination in slavery motivated Mott and other activists to organize a conference about woman's rights, resulting in the Seneca Falls Convention.

The publication lists the convention attendees who signed the Declaration of Sentiments, which was closely based on the Declaration of Independence with its preamble and list of grievances. The document declares that “all men and women are created equal.” and lists the injustices to which men subjected women. The right to vote became the main argument in the woman's rights movement in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Sixty-eight women and thirty-two men signed the Declaration of Sentiments.

Comment Stream

View Older Posts
2 years ago
0

Lucretia Mott (pictured above) was a women's rights pioneer and anti-slavery advocate. She became the first president of the American Equal Rights Association, where she fought for suffrage, education and aid for both women and blacks. Mott was famous for her oratorical skill, which was featured prominently at the Seneca Falls Convention.

2 years ago
0
2 years ago
0

Susan B. Anthony (pictured above) began as a temperance crusader but after meeting Stanton in 1851 she threw herself into the women's rights movement. She worked closely with Stanton throughout the 1860s. Together, they wrote the weekly newspaper, The Revolution, and organized the National Women's Suffrage Association.

2 years ago
0
2 years ago
0

Mary Wollstonecraft (pictured above) was a British writer, philosopher and political theorist best known for her book Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792). The Rights of Women argued that men were not naturally superior to women, but it appeared so because men had greater access to education. She argued that women deserve the same rights as men and should be treated as companion to men, not property of them. The book was influential to women suffragists in the antebellum period.

2 years ago
0
2 years ago
0

Freed from slavery in 1827, Sojourner Truth (pictured above) became an eloquent speaker not only for abolition, but for women's rights as well. A version of her speech at the 1851 Women's rights convention in Akron, Ohio became a cornerstone of the women's movement. Known as the "Ain't I A Women" speech, this version is believed to be a rewriting of the Truth's actual remarks.

2 years ago
0

Paragraph:
In many ways, the American abolition movement sparked the organization of the American women's rights movement. Female abolitionists recognized that many men who supported the social subjugation of black people also supported the social subjugation of women of all races. Women at Anti-Slavery Conferences were often silenced, which directly led to Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucreatia Mott creating the first Women's Rights Convention at Seneca Falls in 1848. The Declaration of Sentiments written at the convention was designed in a style similar to the Declaration of Independence and stated that "the history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward woman, having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over her." The overall goals of the movement, as stated in the Declaration of Sentiments, were to have the grievances against women redressed and to have women given the same legal rights as men. The Jacksonian era of government reform and the Second Great Awakening also sparked the Women's Rights Movement as women realized that the then current legislation was detrimental for women and the popularity of the concept of "free will" over that of "destiny" was a chance for women to include themselves in the movement of free human beings. It's worth noting that this movement mostly ignored the specific oppression faced by black women due to the intersection of racism and misogyny. During the Civil War, women filled the jobs of men who left to fight in the war, and when the men returned after the war ended the women were pushed out of industry and back to the sole position of homemaker. Suffrage specifically was the movement for women's right to vote, the right to work jobs they were capable of, and the right to equal pay for equal work.



Questions:

What were the two main goals of the Women's Rights Movement?

What three events were major catalysts in the creation of the WRM?

What were the three goals of Suffrage?

Who organized the Seneca Falls Conference in 1848?

How long did suffragists spend lobbying for women's right to vote?

2 years ago
0
2 years ago
0

Women have had to fight from the beginning of time for certain rights automatically accessible to men. For example, in this political cartoon a woman is shown struggling to “fit” into a dress, labeled “National Suffrage”. This suggests society’s un-acceptance of women, even if they are part of the nation as citizens. Likewise this is shown in Anne Bradstreet’s writing when she struggles to represent her Puritan belief while also maintaining her humanity.