EMDR treatment for Anxiety-Related Disorders

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a technique for treatment that uses incitement of the privilege and left sides of the equator of the cerebrum to actuate the mind's "data handling framework" and to accomplish mending of brain, body and feelings. EMDR has been significantly explored and proficient for the treatment of anxiety and is perceived as simply ideal for PTSD by the American Psychological Association and the Worldwide Community for Stressful Stress Studies.

EMDR was also found efficient by the US Division of Experts Matters and Division of Defense, the United Kingdom Department of Health, the Israeli National Council for Mental, and many other international health insurance coverage government agencies. To date, EMDR online has helped an estimated two million people of all ages relieve many types of psychological stress.

EMDR therapy is a systematic approach involving bilateral sensory stimulation, such as eye-movements, tapping or sounds, administered while a client focuses on difficult feelings, anxiety, psychological and somatic symptoms or disturbing memories. Psychotherapy which utilizes EMDR therapy seems to facilitate the natural processing abilities of the brain and nervous system. An individual's normal healing abilities are activated and the body-mind balance is supported in its inner capacity to mend.

EMDR therapy is effective in treating individuals who have experienced psychological difficulties arising from traumatic experiences, such as assault, motor vehicle accidents, war trauma, torture, natural disasters, sexual abuse and childhood neglect. It is also increasingly used to treat complaints that are not necessarily trauma-related, such as panic disorder, phobias, performance anxiety, self-esteem issues and other anxiety-related disorders. To date, EMDR has helped an estimated half a million people of all ages relieve many types of psychological distress. It is rapid, safe and effective. EMDR therapy combines different elements to maximize treatment effects. EMDR involves attention to three time periods: the past, present, and future. Focus is given to past disturbing memories and related events. Also, it is given to current situations that cause distress, and to developing the skills and attitudes needed for positive future actions. With EMDR therapy, these items are addressed using an eight-phase treatment approach.

EMDR involves attention to three time periods: the past, present, and future. Focus is given to past disturbing memories and related events. Also, it is given to current situations that cause distress, and to developing the skills and attitudes needed for positive future actions. With EMDR therapy, these items are addressed using an eight-phase treatment approach. The therapist assesses the client’s readiness and develops a treatment plan. Client and therapist identify possible targets for EMDR processing. These include distressing memories and current situations that cause emotional distress. Other targets may include related incidents in the past. Emphasis is placed on the development of specific skills and behaviors that will be needed by the client in future situations. The therapist may teach the client a variety of imagery and stress reduction techniques the client can use during and between sessions. A goal of EMDR is to produce rapid and effective change while the client maintains equilibrium during and between sessions. For more information visit the site http://selfbetter.com/ .