Imagery

Dark spruce forest frowned on either side of the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean toward each other, black and ominous, in the fading light. A vast silence reigned over the land. The land itself was desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness.

Tim Keenan stepped in and bent over Cherokee, fondling him on both sides of the shoulders with hands that rubbed against the grain of the hair and that made slight, pushing-forward movements. These were so many suggestions. Also, their effect was irritating, for Cherokee began to growl, very softly, deep down in his throat. There was a correspondence in rhythm between the growls and the movements of the man's hands. The growl rose in the throat with the culmination of each forward-pushing movement, and ebbed down to start up afresh with the beginning of the next movement. The end of each movement was the accent of the rhythm, the movement ending abruptly and the growling rising with a jerk.

Backward, from the apex, his head slanted down to his neck and forward it slanted uncompromisingly to meet a low and remarkably wide forehead. Beginning here, as though regretting her parsimony, Nature had spread his features with a lavish hand. His eyes were large, and between them was the distance of two eyes. His face, in relation to the rest of him, was prodigious. In order to discover the necessary area, Nature had given him an enormous prognathous jaw. It was wide and heavy, and protruded outward and down until it seemed to rest on his chest. Possibly this appearance was due to the weariness of the slender neck, unable properly to support so great a burden.

The god remained quiet, made no movement; and White Fang's snarl slowly dwindled to a growl that ebbed down in his throat and ceased. Then the god spoke, and at the first sound of his voice, the hair rose on White Fang's neck and the growl rushed up in his throat. But the god made no hostile movement, and went on calmly talking. For a time White Fang growled in unison with him, a correspondence of rhythm being established between growl and voice. But the god talked on interminably. He talked to White Fang as White Fang had never been talked to before. He talked softly and soothingly, with a gentleness that somehow, somewhere, touched White Fang. In spite of himself and all the pricking warnings of his instinct, White Fang began to have confidence in this god. He had a feeling of security that was belied by all his experience with men.

Round and round he went, whirling and turning and reversing, trying to shake off the fifty-pound weight that dragged at his throat. The bull-dog did little but keep his grip. Sometimes, and rarely, he managed to get his feet to the earth and for a moment to brace himself against White Fang. But the next moment his footing would be lost and he would be dragging around in the whirl of one of White Fang's mad gyrations. Cherokee identified himself with his instinct. He knew that he was doing the right thing by holding on, and there came to him certain blissful thrills of satisfaction. At such moments he even closed his eyes and allowed his body to be hurled hither and thither, willy-nilly, careless of any hurt that might thereby come to it. That did not count. The grip was the thing, and the grip he kept.

Comment Stream

2 years ago
0

Every paragraph here used a excellent amount of imagery. I extremely enjoyed the first paragraph because even from the start to the end of the book Jack London used a great array of figurative language or vocabulary. In the second paragraph. The second paragraph told more then showed but had a great structure and word choice. In the third paragraph, I can see why you chose this because, it describes the nature of his awkward build very extensively. In paragraph four, I enjoyed how it talked about the hair raising and White Fang being cautious. It shows his instinct very well. Finally in the last paragraph, I could see so much action without being told. Overall, these were excellent excerpt choices to show imagery from White Fang

2 years ago
0

I love the word choice in the first passage like ominous, because it gives you an idea of how the setting may look. The second passage also includes some great examples like "fondling him on both sides of the shoulders" because i am able to imagine what this scene may look like. The third passage is really detailed and has a lot of imagery which makes it easy to understand and picture. The fourth passage marked a new area of White Fang's life and was extremely important to the rest of the story so it was good that you included that. The fifth passage showed great imagery in saying things like round and round he went and fifty pound weight hanging at his throat.

2 years ago
0

I really like your passages because they gave a really nice sample of how White fang lived and the hardships that he lived through, being a fight dog and all of the word choice by Jack London was phenomenal and I can see why you would have chosen these passages