The Great Depression

By JG,DK, ZT


Time Capsule from Mansfield, Missouri
JG
Pocket Watch

My first artifact is a watch.  I think most families would have a watch for timekeeping.  When things went bad during the depression, the family would keep the watch because it meant something to them. Watches have been passed down generation to generation and a watch would mean something to a family.

Ration Book/Card

I am using ration cards/books for one of my artifacts because I think that the people of the great depression would put a ration book in a time capsule to show how hard the depression was and how some families were so poor that they couldn’t pay for their food so they had to use ration books. I think that the people of the depression want us now to see how tough and difficult it was to live in the depression.

Family Photos

I picked pictures for one of my artifacts because if you want to remember something, you take a picture. So when somebody had a good picture, they could put it in the time capsule for future generations to look at, see, and maybe learn from.

Books

I chose books as one of my artifacts because books are something that everybody had and has. In the depression people may have had a certain book that they loved or a book that they wanted others to see years down the road to learn and to see what the people of that day and age did and liked. Books from the depression could show what the people of that day did and what they enjoyed.

Depression Glass

I chose depression glass as one of my artifacts because it is something that when you went to the store, and you were given a piece after you purchased something. After a few trips, you would have all the glasses of a certain color. Other ways to get it were out at the movies, in flour bags or soapboxes. You would put this glass in a time capsule for the future to see the nice little things that came from the depression. Also, to show how nice and delicate the glasses were back then.

West Coast
DK

Newspaper Article about the strike on the docks during the Depression.

Florence Owens Thompson

Toys in the 1930's

Clothes during the depression in the West Coast

Hooverville pictures

Dust Bowl Region
ZT

The Dust Bowl was the name given to the Great Plains region devastated by drought in 1930s depression-ridden America. The 150,000-square-mile area, encompassing the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles and neighboring sections of Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico, has little rainfall, light soil, and high winds, a potentially destructive combination. When drought struck from 1934 to 1937, the soil lacked the stronger root system of grass as an anchor, so the winds easily picked up the loose topsoil and swirled it into dense dust clouds, called “black blizzards.” Recurrent dust storms wreaked havoc, choking cattle and pasture lands and driving 60 percent of the population from the region. Most of these “exodusters” went to agricultural areas first and then to citiesnational-youth-summit-dust-bowl.

Discuss the story of the Dust Bowl through images from photographer Arthur Rothstein, through song with Woody Guthrie's Dust Bowl ballads, and through text writings from President Roosevelt and farmer Caroline Henderson. Then, challenge students to consider modern environmental issues with a discussion of the 2012 drought and research on contemporary environmental issues. These lessons are designed to support viewing of the National Youth Summit on the Dust Bowl. The archived webcast is available here: http://americanhistory.si.edu/nys/national-youth-...

On May 9th, 1934 a giant storm rose up out of the great plains. A menacing wall of soil and dust headed east across the land, thick enough to block out the sun.


As the nation sank into the Depression and wheat prices plummeted from $2 a bushel to 40 cents, farmers responded by tearing up even more prairie sod in hopes of harvesting bumper crops. When prices fell even further, the "suitcase farmers" who had moved in for quick profits simply abandoned their fields. Huge swaths of eight states, from the Dakotas to Texas and New Mexico, where native grasses had evolved over thousands of years to create a delicate equilibrium with the wild weather swings of the Plains, now lay naked and exposed.


Hoovervilles

Dust Bowl Masks

Dust Covering a City

1930's Dust Mast

Kitchen in the Dust Bowl Region

Old Antique Glasses



East Coast
TM

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And then a whole lot of nothing. That is TM's perspective on the depression

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