Facts about an O.G.Y.N.

By: Ja'Maya Coleman
(keeping it short)

Twin girls! Adorable! :)

Hello! My name is Ja'Maya Coleman and I am going to give you some facts about an O.B.G.Y.N.

An OB/GYN is a physician specialist who provides medical and surgical care to women and has particular expertise in pregnancy, childbirth, and disorders of the reproductive system.

THE NAME OF AN OB/GYN/WHAT THEY DO

An obstetrician/gynecologist, commonly called as an OB/GYN can serve as a primary physician and often serve as consultants to other physicians. OB/GYNs can have private practices, work in hospital or clinic settings, and maintain teaching positions at university hospitals. OB/GYNs can also work public health and preventive medicine administrations.

HOW TO BECOME AN OB/GYN / EDUCATION THAT IS REQUIRED

To becoming an OB/GYN you must graduate from an approved medical school, go to an OB/GYN residency program (4 years).

OB/GYNs also do ultrasounds, reproductive endocrinology, obstetrics and etc.

They also have to experience in primary and preventive care role for the equivalent of at least 6 months of the residency, including inpatient and ambulatory care; diagnosis and management of breast disease and performance and interpretation of diagnostic pelvic and etc.

Have to pass a national exam

WORK HOURS

OB/GYNs work frequently exceed 60 hours a week in the busier practices. This typically can result in being awakened at all hours of the night and/or being asked to come in at irregular times to evaluate a patient.

WORK ENVIRONMENT OF AN OB/GYN/PAY/WAGES

Working conditions are usually pleasant with the work environment being indoors in well lighted exam rooms and hospitals.

OB/GYNs get paid about $350,000 a year. Annual wages are $96,000-$286,00 and Hourly wages are $46.15-$137.50.

http://www.healthcaresalaryonline.com/ob-gyn-docto...
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18055739
http://www.healthcommunities.com/pregnancy/what-is-obgyn.shtml

COMMON IN OB/GYN WORK

Surgical needlestick injuries are common in obstetrics and gynecology and can cause transmission of viral diseases including hepatitis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Strategies to reduce the rate of needlestick injuries include using instruments rather than fingers to retract tissue and grasp needles, double gloving, using surgical staplers for skin closure, and substituting blunt tip surgical needles for sharp tip needles where applicable. (VERY DANGEROUS)

I love babies and I love to take care of them!!! <3<3

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