Second Great Awakening

Tyler Albrecht and Austin Martin

The first image is a painting of  an 1839 Methodist Camp meeting. Congregations commonly held these camp meetings to convert citizens to their religion. You can see the effect that these meetings had on people; they look like they are in shock from what they heard, just like how the Second Great Awakening shocked the country as a whole.

The second image is a graph of religous denominations in America in the early 1800s. It is easy to see what kind of effect the Second Great Awakening had on the religous characteristics of America. The majority of the population was converted to either Baptist or Methodist, which was the main goal of this movement.

Comment Stream

2 years ago
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2 years ago
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In this newspaper article, the author talks about how he believes that the camp meetings are an unnecessary time waster. He states specifically how if these meetings are 4 days long, farmers that can't afford to hire extra help wont be able to make ends meet while attending these meetings. This article shows how not all people were happy about this movement. Many people believed in what the ministers were saying, but also thought that the ministers are trying to do too much.

2 years ago
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The second great awakening was a Protestant revival in the early 19th century. The leaders included Charles Grandison Finney (The Father of Modern Revivalism.) Henry Ward Beecher (known for his support of the abolition of slavery), and Joseph Smith (founder of Mormonism). Not only did the revival spur the rapid increase of Baptist and Methodist conversion, but it led to many social reforms. This revival had been progressing a few decades. Because the revival was to purify society before the second coming of Jesus, the revival led to social reforms with sinful ideals such as slavery. The objective was to purify society and remedy sinful institutions before Jesus arrived. In a broader sense this led to many ideals that society needed to be reformed so that it fit with moral philosophies rooted in evangelist morals under God. This movement ended up inspiring many movements like the temperance movement, which promoted moderation in the consumption of hard liquors and in some cases teetotalism (total alcohol abstinence), in the way it led to social reforms. The temperance movement is just one example of how the second great awakening inspired many social reform movements uniting the people under the judgement of God.

2 years ago
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Further discussion

Beechers bible- the name given to the rifles given to anti slavery immigrants in Kentucky

More women converted in the awakening than men-It is unclear why women converted more but it is hypothesized that conversion gave women peer support and place for meaningful activity outside the home, providing many women with communal identity and shared experiences

Charles Finney coined "burned over districts" to describe the areas covered with revivals

Evangelical converts were leading figures in a variety of 19th century reform movements because they thought to gain salvation through the purification of sin in all forms

Evangelists often directly addressed issues such as slavery, greed, and poverty, laying the groundwork for later reform movements

Caused more religious influence in politics