White Fang Imagery

Dark spruce forest frowned on either side of the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean toward each other, black and ominous, in the fading light. A vast silence reigned over the land. The land itself was a desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness. There was a hint in it of laughter, but of a laughter more terrible than any sadness- a laughter that was mirthless as the smile of the Sphinx, a laughter cold as the frost and partaking of the grimness of infallibility.

The animal was certainly not cinnamon-colored.  Its coat was the true wolfcoat.  The dominant color was gray, and yet there was to it a faint reddish hue-a hue that was baffling, that appeared and disappeared, that was more like an illusion of the vision, now gray, distinctly gray, and again giving hints and glints of a vague redness of color not classifiable in terms of ordinary experience.

There were cries of men, the churn of sleds, the creaking of harnesses, and the eager whimpering of straining dogs. Four sleds pulled in from the river bed to the camp among the trees.  Half a dozen men were about the man who crouched in the center of the dying fire.  They were shaking and prodding him into consciousness.  He looked at them like a drunken man and maundered in strange, sleepy speech.

To their ears came the sounds of dogs, wrangling and scuffling, the guttural cries of men, the sharper voices of scolding women, and once the shrill and plaintive cry of a child.  With the exception of the huge bulks of the skin lodges, little could be seen save the flames of the fire, broken by the movements of intervening bodies, and the smoke rising slowly on the quiet air.  But to their nostrils came the myriad smells of an Indian camp, carrying a story that was largely incomprehensible to One Eye, but every detail of which the she-wolf knew.

The hair bristled up on the gray cub's back, but it bristled silently.  How was he to know that this thing that sniffed was a thing at which to bristle?  It was not born of any knowledge of his, yet it was the visible expression of the fear that was in him, and for which, in his own life, there was no accounting.  But fear was accompanied by another instinct- that of concealment.  The cub was in a frenzy of terror, yet he lay without movement or sound, frozen, petrified into immobility, to all appearances dead.  His mother, coming home, growled as she smelled the wolverine's track, and bounded into the cave and licked and nuzzled him with undue vehemence of affection.  And the cub felt that somehow he had escaped a great hunt.

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2 years ago
0

It felt in the third paragraph that I was their with the mushers and the dogs

2 years ago
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Your first paragraph was very descriptive and i Like how you showed imagery.

2 years ago
0

Your picture perfectly shows the imagery in the 4 paragraph.

2 years ago
0

In your second paragraph i like how you used colors and you had words like vague.

2 years ago
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I liked how you picked the passage when Jack Lodon shows White Fangs instinct come out.

2 years ago
0

I liked how each sentence used specific words describing what was happening.

2 years ago
0

I loved the words you used, such as scuffling and wrangling.

2 years ago
0

In your last paragraph i could really picture what was happening such as when they say his hair bristled up on his back.

2 years ago
0

hi

2 years ago
0

tai no