Narcolepsy

by Mariah and Tara

The brain of someone that has Narcolepsy.

Narcolepsy is a chronic brain disorder that makes you fall asleep in the shortest amount of time. People with this disease normally experience disturbed nocturnal sleep. Which means people with narcolepsy normally experience the REM stage within 5 minutes when somebody who doesn't have narcolepsy experiences the REM stage within an hour or so.

Shows the side effects of someone with narcolepsy and someone who does not.

Sometimes, the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the brain cells involved in regulating the sleep-wake cycle. It is believed that narcolepsy is the result of these cells being damaged or destroyed.

Many people with narcolepsy do not know they have the sleep disorder. About one in 2,000 people have some form of narcolepsy. Narcolepsy may run in some families, but most cases are not genetic. The disorder is extremely rare in children. The cause of narcolepsy is still unknown, but recent research suggests that many people with narcolepsy with cataplexy have low levels of the neurotransmitter hypocretin, a chemical that regulates arousal, wakefulness and appetite.

Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder that makes you feel overwhelmingly tired, and in severe cases, have sudden uncontrollable sleep attacks. Narcolepsy can impact nearly every aspect of your life. It is dangerous because you can have excessive sleepiness or a sleep attack at any time of the day, in the middle of any activity including eating, walking or driving. Operating a vehicle with untreated narcolepsy can be very dangerous and some states even have laws against it

When you add up the hours of total sleep time, people with narcolepsy don’t necessarily sleep any more than people who don’t have the sleep disorder. This is especially true when you consider that many people with narcolepsy often have difficulty sleeping through the night because of unwanted awakenings.

Some people assume that because they are consistently tired during the day, that they may have narcolepsy. Other sleep disorders that cause daytime sleepiness are often mistaken for narcolepsy. These include sleep apean, circadian rhythm sleep disorders Medical conditions, mental health disorders and use of certain medications or substances can also cause symptoms similar to narcolepsy.

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