When the Jews go Marching Home Again

The Holocaust was the state-sponsored, systematic, persecution and annihilation of European Jewry by Nazi Germany and its collaborators, between 1933 and 1945.

The Death Camps

Concentration Camps were camps in which people where imprisoned for one reason or another and detained indefiantly. Most prisoners were forced to work for their captor. In the case of the German concentration camps, most prisoners were Jews, but there were a fair amount of "political opponents" of the Nazi Party. The Schutzstaffel (a high honor Nazi guard, also known as the SS) and the Sturmabteilungen ( also known as the SA) created camps all over Germany just to fit all of the prisoners (Concentration Camps, 1933-1945, Holocaust Encyclopedia) In July 1934 Hitler ordered Heinrich Himmler to the job of organizing the camps.  Himmler then gave Theodor Eicke the job of Inspector of the camps.  Since he was already the commander of a camp at Dachua, Eicke had already come up with a system of organizing the camps in 1933. His system became the regulation for all of the camps.

The Americans and
the Jews

During the war the rescuing of the Jews was not on the top of America's to do list. In fact America even made the process of immigration even harder during the war, due to security reasons. Nevertheless 45% of the immigrants into America  were Jews in 1941. America not only closed it's borders but we also practically ignored the situation with the concentration camps.  Although news about the mass genocide was published, the articles were placed on  the sixth page, decreasing it's importance and urgency. The US press had information concerning the death of the Jews but they didn't clarify the information. When it came to America the Jews were on their own.

Adolf's rise to power

The Nazi party came to power as a protest group against the government at the time. It criticised the government, saying it was weak and old-fashioned. In the propaganda the party claimed to speak for all " Non-Jewish Germans, regardless of class, religion, or region." The idea of a "national community"  and political and social peace drew more and more people into the party. Still people weren't screaming for another war so soon. The Nazi Propagandists had to fix this problem. They said Germany needed to protect itself from the future attacks of other countries. Even so, Hitler did not want to force people to fight. The propagandists tried many tactics, including trying to scare the Germans with ideas that the Jews would destroy German culture and freedom if Germany lost the war.

The top poster says "This hereditarily ill person will cost our national community 60,000 Reichmarks over the course of his lifetime. Citizen, this is your money." The bottom reads, "Behind the enemy powers: the Jew." Both were meant to alienate those who were not "racially pure" from the "national community."

Citations

"Concentration Camps, 1933–1939." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 20 June 2014. Web. 14 Jan. 2015. <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005263>

"Rallying the Nation." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 20 June 2014. Web. 15 Jan. 2015. <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007818>.

"The United States and the Holocaust." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 20 June 2014. Web. 15 Jan. 2015. <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005182>.

"Concentration Camp System: In Depth." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 20 June 2014. Web. 19 Jan. 2015. <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007387>.

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