Discipline Models

Discipline with Dignity
vs.
Positive Classroom Discipline

Discipline with Dignity
Summary

Discipline with dignity was developed by Dr. Allen Mendler. Dr. Mendler said, " your goal as an educator should be to influence change." The key to this model is "creating a positive motivation for children to adopt new behaviors" (Delisio, 2011). Building relationships with students is at the heart of this model. Through positive relationships, educators can utilize these connections during discipline moments. In addition, to building relationships, the discipline with dignity model suggests having the students assist in decision making. This model is not about teacher control but about a relationship with "choices and limits" (Discipline Associates, 2015).

Positive Classroom Discipline
Summary

Positive classroom discipline is  based on the principle of connecting with children to assist them in becoming "responsible, respectful,and resourceful members of their community" (Positive discipline, 2015). This behavior model focuses on respect in a positive classroom environment, solution and reasons to behaviors, and a respectful teacher/student relationship. In addition, Dr. Fred Jones suggest not only promoting the positive behavior but implementing incentives in the form of preferred activities in the classroom to promote positive behavior. (www.educationworld.com, 2015)

Details of each Discipline Model

Implementation of
Discipline with Dignity

Example 1: The core of Discipline with Dignity is building a positive relationship. To implement the core of this discipline model, as an educator I would meet and greet each student at the door. This act of caring lays the groundwork of the teacher student relationship and promotes future effective communication.

Example 2: When misbehavior occurs,focus on instruction on how to fix the behavior not threats. For example when a student does not come to math class prepared with a pencil and his notes, the teacher can give instructions. The teacher can say "I am glad you made it to class today but what could you have done to have been prepared?" Listening to the student's response is key for further interaction and the educator should use this as a learning moment for the student.

Example 3: Avoiding a power struggle is key when dealing with negative behavior situations. When implementing discipline with dignity, teachers must keep all communication positive. For instance, when a situation is full of emotion, the teacher must stop the confrontation and allow for a private meeting time. The private meeting allows for the student to have the last word in the classroom and maintain dignity.

Implementation of
Positive Classroom Discipline

Example 1: A tool of positive discipline involves identification of why a negative behavior occurred. The key is identifying why the behavior took place not changing the behavior.  For example, a student might be negative towards other students while lining up to walk to the gym. Communicating with the student and trying to identify why the student was negative towards other student who you know are usually his friends is important and not telling the student to stop acting that way. A teacher may discover the student did not have breakfast and is acting out based on being hungry.

Example 2: Another implementation rule is focusing on solutions to misbehavior and not punishment. Students may seem to be noisy and horseplay during times of transition from activity to activity. By simply implementing transition procedures and practicing the procedures with the students may eliminate the noise and horseplay during transition time.

Example 3: Encouraging students' positive behavior promotes long term behavior change.  For instance, a teacher may say "I am confident that all of you can walk down the hall quietly because Monday and Tuesday each one of you did just that." This statement encourages each student to continue positive behavior.

References

Delisio, E. (2011) Discipline with dignity stresses positive motivation. Retrieved from http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin534.shtml

Curwin, R. L., & Mendler, A. N. (1999). Discipline with dignity. Alexandria, Va., USA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Discipline Associates: Discipline with dignity. Retrieved on September 13, 2015 from http://stuff4educators.com/index.php?p=1_29_Discipline-with-Dignity

Dr. Fred Jones’s tools for teaching: Responsibility training. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/columnists/jones/jones027.shtml

Positive Discipline: What is positive discipline? Retrieved on September 13, 2015 from http://positivediscipline.com/files/What-is-Positive-Discipline.pdf