The Bonds of Chemistry

Ionic Bonds:

An ionic bond is a bond between a metal and a nonmetal. Characteristics of this type of bond include the appearance of being powdery or granular, being soluble, not melting easily, and not conducting electricity when solid, but conducting when a liquid or dissolved. Examples include table salt (NaCl), calcium chloride (CaCl), magnesium oxide (MgO), and potassium bromide (KBr).

Covalent Bonds:

A covalent bond is a bond between two nonmetals. Characteristics of this type of bond include the appearance of being powdery or granular, sometimes being soluble, always melting, and never conducting electricity. Examples include water (H2O), hydrogen molecules (H2), ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), and hydrogen chloride (HCl).

Metallic Bonds:

A metallic bond is a bond between two metals. Characteristics of this type of bond include the appearance of being shiny, never being soluble, not melting easily, and always conducting electricity. Examples include brass (CuZn), steel (CFe), platinum (Pt), and mercury (Hg).

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