Infants Pattern of Development

                                                BY: Joshua and Amanda

Intellectual Needs

  • picture books with bright colors and high-contrast patterns.
  • smile at them and engage them in conversation from the day they were born.
  • hang a mobile with high-contrast patterns above the changing table or in her crib.
  • create a floor gym with several hanging toys for them to lie beneath, look at, and reach for them.
  • Children at this age learn by exploring with their hands and mouth. They bang, throw, drop, shake, and put items in their mouths.
  • picture books with bright colors and high-contrast patterns.
  • smile at them and engage them in conversation from the day they were born.
  • hang a mobile with high-contrast patterns above the changing table or in her crib.
  • create a floor gym with several hanging toys for them to lie beneath, look at, and reach for them.
  • Children at this age learn by exploring with their hands and mouth. They bang, throw, drop, shake, and put items in their mouths.

Emotional Needs

  • Crying is the primary means of communication when infants’ and toddlers’ needs are not being met.
  • Similarly, they smile and giggle when they want more of something, and turn their head, shut their eyes, or cry when they want less of something.
  • helps build feelings of security and a healthy attachment between a child and her caregivers.
  • love and attention by developing a sense of trust

Social Needs

  • You can expect your child to imitate facial expressions, and even develop a social smile by three months.
  • Talking begins with babbling, which leads to gradually learning to say and respond to simple words and phrases.
  • happy to engage with complete strangers
  • plays with other children and adults as she grows

Physical Needs

  • Children will first learn to hold their head up. Little by little, they begin to roll and to sit (usually by six months).
  • Kids learn to creep, then crawl, pull themselves up, walk while holding onto furniture, stand, and then walk two or three steps without assistance (usually by 12 months).
  • At 24 months, children can begin to run, kick a ball, and walk up and down stairs (while holding onto someone’s hand).

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2 years ago
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Luis: impressive,enjoyable

2 years ago
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Chudi : Some facts repeated but great job.

2 years ago
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Brittney: I really like how you guys give detailed examples. I really enjoyed the social facts about children engaging.

2 years ago
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great facts

2 years ago
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Mileides&Jackeline: We both really liked your information very much

2 years ago
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Wow ! i really like all the information but maybe you should have shortened it but really nice pictures . Ormon: love the picture and good information's but do make them a little shorter

2 years ago
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kayla ; this is cool and informational pluse its the best one i seen by far on infants

2 years ago
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Jackie R: There is a lot of interesting facts like the pictures good job!

2 years ago
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Darian; OH MY GAWWWWD!! This was SOOOO AMAZING! I LOVE IT I learned alot of things about babies THANK YOU

2 years ago
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Giovany : great information and I Like the pictures Its very interesting