Summaries

Paul Mason report on Tuition Fees Protest (BBC Newsnight)

This BBC Newsnight report is about a large student protest in London. The protesters, including students, school pupils, sixth-formers, academics and parents, were protesting against the coalition government's decision to raise university fees. School students are worried about being in debt after studying at university. Some sixth-formers do not know if they will be able to go to university because of the huge amount of debt they will be forced to have if their parents are not well-off enough to pay for them. Some students feel that the protest shows that people now believe they can resist the government and the government will listen. This protest is being led by the youngest students, the sixth-formers, who are the ones who will be the most effected by the high fees. Some protesters broke through police lines and the skirmishes, which went on long into the night, resulted in numerous casualties. But most people just wanted to dance, especially the youngest. The government has been destabilised by this unprecedented student movement. (172 words)

University students look abroad as tuition fees rise

(Summary produced in class by group 1)

Maastricht is an old city in the Netherlands. Recently it has become a student city; there are now 25000 students in Maastricht. Many of these new students are from other countries. International students come from all over the world to study there so they can meet people with different languages and cultures. Now 43% of university students there of are from outside The Netherlands, most of them are from England.

UK students started studying abroad a few years ago and especially in The Netherlands, in Maastricht, as the tuition fees are lower than in the UK. Also UK students have decided to study abroad because the UK university places are oversubscribed. Moreover the university there is cheaper and students can expect to graduate with no debt, find a job easily, and learn how to work with people with different international backgrounds/ from other countries.

The international classroom is a great experience; pupils from different countries, religions and backgrounds can learn together. Some of the students all also contributing to the local economy.

Unfortunately, tuition fees in Maastricht are expected to rise. (181 words)

Group 2

Maastricht is an old city and used to be a tourist city but it's also a student city with a university.

Maastricht university is an international university with students who have different backgrounds, nationalities and languages. Most of the international students are from the United Kingdom. This phenomenon could be explained by the fact that tuition fees in Maastricht university are cheaper than in the UK and because university places are oversubscribed in the UK.

According to the BBC, as tuition fees are very high in Great Britain, students are leaving the country to study in the Netherlands / elsewhere / abroad / in other countries.

In the report, one student interviewed said that in Maastricht there is no pressure about being in debt at the end of the year and students don't have to wonder if they can go to university or not.

One teacher / the teacher who was interviewed said / told the reporter it's a good experience for the 43% of students who come from abroad because they mix with other students from different countries, with different religions, and so it's better for getting a job.

The reporter also said that tuition fees are expected to rise in the Netherlands.

These foreign students benefit the local economy. (211 words)

How to write a summary

How to write a summary.

Introduction:

It is useful to learn how to write a good summary because we often need to summarise different kinds of documents.

Topic Sentence

In his presentation “How to write a summary,” Shaun Mcleod …

… claims that there are four main things to keep in mind in order to write a successful summary.

….presents four key ideas / four main points about summary writing.

… gives four important rules to follow when writing summaries.

Supporting sentences 1 (main point 1)

A summary must be clear, concise, and brief. This means that only the main, essential information should be included. Ideally, someone who did not see or read the original will get all the important information about it from your summary. Being concise means not providing unecessary detail or description.

Supporting sentences 2 (main point 2)

A summary needs to be well structured with an introduction, a topic sentence, supporting sentences, and a conclusion. The topic sentence might contain information about the nature of the document, the title, and the author. Each supporting sentence will communicate one main idea. It is important to follow the same order as the original document.

Supporting sentences 3 (main point 3)

It is very important to paraphrase and not quote or copy. When writing a summary, you must use your own words.

Supporting sentences 4 (main point 4)

A summary should be objective, which means reporting information rather than giving your own opinion on it.

Conclusion

According to the speaker, if you follow all of this advise, you will improve your summary writing skills.

How to write a summary.

It is useful to learn how to write a good summary because we often need to summarise different kinds of documents. In his presentation “How to write a summary,” Shaun Mcleod claims that there are four main things to keep in mind in order to write a successful summary. A summary must be clear, concise, and brief. This means that only the main, essential information should be included. Ideally, someone who did not see or read the original will get all the important information about it from your summary. Being concise means not providing unecessary detail or description. A summary needs to be well structured with an introduction, a topic sentence, supporting sentences, and a conclusion. The topic sentence might contain information about the nature of the document, the title, and the author. Each supporting sentence will communicate one main idea. It is important to follow the same order as the original document. It is very important to paraphrase and not quote or copy. When writing a summary, you must use your own words. A summary should be objective, which means reporting information rather than giving your own opinion on it. According to the speaker, if you follow all of this advise, you will improve your summary writing skills. (214 words)

UK Visa policies put off international students

Where?

UK; University of Westminster; London Metropolitan University

Who?

International students (genuine vs. bogus); Home secretary Teresa May; Mayor of London Boris Johnson; vietnamese doctoral student; visa advisor from University of Westminster

What?

international student visas; immigration statistics very high but recent decrease due to fewer international students

How?

new policies; restrictions on student visas; longer waiting periods; removing international students from the UK

Why?

Some students are abusing their visas to work rather than study

Consequences/outcome/ questions raised?

discourage students from coming to UK; difficult for genuine students to get visas; loss of international students has financial, cultural and academic consequences for universities


An article about Coca Cola

Write an article on Coca Cola for a business magazine. Use the notes below and the correct form of the words in brackets.

Birth of a refreshing idea

Coca Cola born in Atlanta, Georgia, May 8, 1886

Dr John Smith Pemberton: pharmacist, (invent and produce) syrup

Syrup (mix) with carbonated water

First ad for CC in The Atlanta Journal

Pemberton gradually (sell) portions of business

A symbol of friendship

World War II: new opportunities for the company

Objective of CC: a bottle of CC for US soldiers for 5 cents everywhere

During war: military service personnel (consume) over 5 billion bottles

Local populations: Coke popular

End of war: growth for the company

A global business

End of 20th century: expansion and deep bond with people everywhere

3 independent surveys: CC most famous + favourite brand in world

Beyond taste: emotional attachment

Example: 1985 : new taste for Coke

In blind tests: OK, but people (not want to lose) original Coke

So original formula back as Coca Cola Classic

Other landmark: introduction of Diet Coke, 1982, very successful

Today: company (operate) in over 200 countries; (market) almost 450 brands

Sophisticated system to produce and distribute products (e.g. Diet Coke, Sprite and Fanta)

Here is an example of the kind of text you could write:

Coca Cola was born in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 8th, 1886. The pharmacist, Dr John Smith Pemberton, invented and produced the syrup which was mixed with carbonated water. The first advertisement for Coca Cola appeared in The Atlanta Journal. As the company grew, Pemberton gradually sold portions of the business. World War II presented new opportunities for the company. The company aimed to provide every American solider with a bottle of Coca Cola for just five cents, no matter where they were. During the war, military personnel consumed over five billion bottles of the fizzy drink. Coke became popular among local populations and following the end of the war, sales, and the company, grew. By the end of the 20th century, the Coca Cola company has expanded to become a global business. The brand has established a bond with customers all over the world and was voted the world's favourite brand in three independent customer surveys. It seems that Coca Cola drinkers have an emotional attachment to the brand which goes beyond questions of taste. This is exemplified by the company's attempt to create a new taste for its famous product. The result of blind tests showed that, even though customers thought the new taste was satisfactory, they did not want to lose the original Coke flavour. As a result, the original formula was brought back and marketed as Coca Cola Classic. Another landmark in the product's history was the successful introduction of Diet Coke in 1982. Today the company operates in over 200 countries, markets almost 450 brands, and has developed a sophisticated system for the production and distribution of its products, which include Diet Coke, Sprite, and Fanta.

(280 words)